Results and Followup to Gastrointestinal Society, Canada 2016 Survey on Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS)

January 29, 2017

About one year ago, on January 26, 2016, IBS Impact posted a national online survey invitation by the Gastrointestinal (GI) Society, also known as the Canadian Society of Intestinal Research. The GI Society asked adults with diagnosed irritable bowel syndrome and parents/caregivers of children with diagnosed irritable bowel syndrome from across Canada about experiences, opinions and effects of IBS, with the intention of using the results to shape the organization’s programs, as well as future community awareness and advocacy among health care providers and policy makers and the general public.

Last month, the GI Society posted a report, Gastrointestinal Society 2016 Survey Results: Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS), which is available for download in PDF format from the link. Some highlights include the following:

There were a total of 2961 responses from all provinces and territories of Canada, approximately proportional to population. 2505 participants responded in English and 456 in French from the organization’s French-language mirror site. 86% of respondents were female, 14% male. 90% were between the ages of 30-69.

53% had had IBS for more than 10 years. 41% reported IBS-M (mixed subtype, formerly referred to as IBS-A for alternating), 35% IBS-D (diarrhea-predominant subtype), 18% IBS-C (constipation-predominant subtype) and 6% unsure. In a question rating pain in the previous 3 months on a 1-5 scale with 1 as no pain, and 5 as the worst pain, 4% chose 1, 20% chose 2, 39% chose 3, 28% chose 4 and 9% chose 5. Respondents were also asked to rate other common IBS symptom severity as never experience, mild, moderate, and severe.

According to the report, fewer than half of respondents have seen a gastroenterologist. Those who have consulted doctors for IBS mostly see general practitioners. 26% reported not seeing a doctor for IBS at least once a year. Of the remainder, the largest subgroups reported 1-2 visits or 3-5 visits. Small percentages in the single digits each reported 6-10 visits or 11 or more visits. 12% stated they had been hospitalized for IBS. 62% use two or more medications or treatments regularly. 16% stated they cannot afford prescribed treatments and 26% that they can only afford some. Medications commonly used for IBS pain are sufficiently effective for only about one-third. Only 21% of survey participants describe their symptoms as under control, 45% somewhat under control, 34% no symptoms under control. The report notes that these results are similar to a 2015 nationwide survey by the American Gastroenterological Association in the United States, IBS in America.

Most of the GI Society’s respondents also indicate co-existing medical conditions and/or quality of life effects. 83% report the need to limit their diet. 71% report anxiety at least some of the time with 27%  reporting an anxiety disorder diagnosis. 32% have a mood disorder, 27% gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), 24% sleep disorders, 15% fibromyalgia. 76% state that IBS interferes with everyday activities at least some of the time. 37% overall state that in an average month they cannot leave their homes at least some of the time, with higher percentages in the IBS-D subset.  46% of respondents who are employed and/or are students report that they miss time from work or school in an average month due to IBS.

The report concludes that there continue to be unmet treatment and quality of life needs for many Canadians with IBS and that in particular, IBS pain needs improved treatment options, as that remains a significant symptom for most people with IBS that is significantly associated with decreased quality of life. The report also states that the time between symptom onset and diagnosis and diagnosis and relief of symptoms needs to be shortened. This may be possible through increased collaboration between patients and physicians.

The GI Society is asking those who responded in the original survey to participate in a five question online followup survey. The original survey is now completed and no longer available for new replies, but the GI Society also invites those who did not have the opportunity to complete the original survey to answer the followup. At this time, January 29, 2017, the followup questions are open at the original survey link. No closing date for responses is indicated. Please address any questions about this survey directly to the GI Society

http://www.badgut.org/ibs-survey/

IBS Impact commends the Gastrointestinal Society for its efforts to gather and publicize the views of its constituency. We encourage  Canadian readers with IBS or IBS-affected minor children to continue to express and advocate for their needs and desires to the organization and their health care and community services providers and national, provincial and local policy makers through the followup survey and other means. We hope that the survey results amplify and catalyze positive changes for the IBS community in Canada, and by extension, worldwide.

 


IBS Network in the United Kingdom Adds New In-Person Support Groups, January 2017

January 13, 2017

As reported by this blog on January 21, 2015 and October 23, 2016, the IBS Network, the United Kingdom’s national charity for irritable bowel syndrome, has been working over the past two years or so to increase local self-help support groups in England. Recently, IBS Impact became aware of three new groups that are scheduled to start this month with IBS Network support.

In addition to existing groups in London and the Leeds/Bradford area,  Alton, Durham and Newcastle Upon Tyne have  joined the list. Each group plans to meet monthly, but schedules and meeting locations vary. The IBS Network support group page gives further details.  IBS Impact suggests that interested people confirm directly with the group leader for the desired community, using the provided contact information, in case of any changes.

At this time, three one-day training dates in 2017 for potential support group leaders remain. The IBS Network welcomes both interested people with IBS and professionals to volunteer. At this time, the trainings will be held in Sheffield, at venues near the IBS Network office, but if there is sufficient interest, other locations will be considered. Based on details previously provided by the IBS Network,  one can anticipate a several hour event with breaks, for which IBS-friendly refreshments and lunch will be provided.

For further information, please see the same link above or contact Sam Yardy directly at sam@theibsnetwork.org

Over the years, including on January 12, 2015,  IBS Impact has written extensively about how in various countries, in-person support and other services for people with IBS and families in their own local communities tend to be hard to find. Either they don’t exist, unless one happens to live near a major functional GI research center, or if they do exist, enough people with IBS and health care or social service providers they may deal with simply do not know they are there. Fortunately, online resources for IBS information and support, some higher quality than others, are well-established means of communication, but even in the social media age, not everyone is comfortable online, and it remains difficult for many newly-diagnosed and veteran IBSers alike to sort through which sites and groups are reputable and useful and those that are not. Individuals differ, and even with the same individual, preferences, needs and logistical concerns may change in different circumstances or phases of life. IBS Impact advocates increasing a range of programs and means of reaching people so that people with IBS and families have choices, and is pleased for our readers in England that the options available to them are expanding.

For our readers elsewhere, please see the main IBS Impact website links page, last updated in December 2016, for some existing IBS organizations and online support groups in several English-speaking countries. Some have a country-specific focus, but many welcome international participation. Readers are also welcome to contact us  with new resources that may become available from time to time. Such suggestions will be given thoughtful consideration.


IBS Impact’s Top 25 Countries and Top 10 Posts of 2016

January 1, 2017

For this first week of the New Year, IBS Impact is once again participating in the common December-January blogger tradition of highlighting popular posts and interesting blog statistics from the year just past.

This blog reached readers in 131 countries and territories during 2016, which is an annual record just short of the cumulative 133 for the five years WordPress has made country statistics available to individual blog owners. Both the number of visitors and total number of hits increased by almost 230% over 2015, also records,  largely because of this blog’s coverage of the May 2016 release of the Rome IV international diagnostic criteria, despite half the number of posts published this year.

While, predictably, the top 5 countries this year are ones where English is an official or major secondary language, total blog hits span every continent, underscoring that IBS is a global problem, not the common, inaccurate stereotype of it as a nuisance disorder caused by overindulgent North American diets and lifestyles. A list of the top 25 better reflects the diversity of countries of origin represented, which appears to change somewhat every year. It is hoped that the vast majority are legitimate visits, even from those who might not have been searching specifically for information about IBS, and not simply potential spammers. In order, the countries are:

1.  United States

2. United Kingdom

3. India

4. Canada

5. Australia

6. Italy

7. Brazil

8. Mexico

9.  South Korea

10. Saudi Arabia

11. Japan

12. Egypt

13. Colombia

14. Spain

15. Turkey

16. Vietnam

17. Romania

18. Thailand

19. Netherlands

20. Singapore

21. Russia

22. Taiwan

23. Portugal

24. Germany

25. Indonesia

Below are the top 10 individual posts that received the most hits during 2016. The #1 post on the Rome IV criteria was published in early June of this year, and the number of hits on this important topic is about 9 times that of the #2 post. The #2 post, on functional gastrointestinal disorders like IBS being classified as service-connected disabilities for U.S. military veterans, was originally published in 2011, soon after the inception of this blog, and held the top spot consistently every year and cumulatively from 2011 through 2015 until the release of the Rome update in May 2016.

Most of the posts in the list were first published in 2011 through 2015. However, they continue to attract attention because they address topics that are of ongoing concern to people with IBS. Perhaps longtime readers can refresh their memories and newer readers will discover something interesting and useful. In order, the posts are:

1. New Rome IV Diagnostic Criteria for Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) Unveiled May 2016, June 9, 2016

2. Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders/IBS Considered Presumptive Service-Connected Disabilities for U.S. Gulf War Veterans,  August 12, 2011

3. New Rome IV Diagnostic Criteria for Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) Will Include Individualized Clinical Profiles, October 11, 2015

4. The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS), July 30, 2012

5. Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) and a Debate on “Can’t Wait” Cards,  November 25, 2012  Please note that the blog originally linked in the above post as a basis for discussion no longer exists on WordPress.com. However, the ideas raised and the invitation by IBS Impact for readers and the IBS community to continue to discuss related concerns are still valid.

6. Education Laws and Resources for Students with Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS), August 27, 2013

7.  Public Restroom Access and Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS), February 21, 2012

8. Massachusetts Enacts Restroom Access Act,  August 20, 2012

9. Restroom Access Act (Ally’s Law) Updates in Maryland and Maine, May 10, 2013

10. Representative Joyce of Ohio Co-Sponsors HR 2311 for Functional Gastrointestinal and Motility Disorders, June 28, 2016

This blog was begun in July 2011, a few months after the launch of the main IBS Impact website, and a bit over a year after the inception of IBS Impact itself. It is intended as a supplement to the many resources on our main site, one that can be updated relatively quickly with time-sensitive news, advocacy and clinical trial opportunities, as well as providing well-researched, scientifically reputable information on IBS and commentary on broader issues affecting the IBS community that may not be widely discussed on other sites. It is meant to be useful to a broad readership: people with IBS and related conditions, both those who may have lived with IBS for some time and those with recent onset or who are new to IBS sites online, family members and friends, health care and human service professionals who may interact with us, and the general public. We are pleased that it continues to fulfill this role.

IBS Impact wishes everyone a happy, healthy, prosperous and productive New Year and looks forward in 2017 to advances in awareness, advocacy, research, treatment and community support systems that benefit the worldwide IBS community.