Results and Followup to Gastrointestinal Society, Canada 2016 Survey on Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS)

About one year ago, on January 26, 2016, IBS Impact posted a national online survey invitation by the Gastrointestinal (GI) Society, also known as the Canadian Society of Intestinal Research. The GI Society asked adults with diagnosed irritable bowel syndrome and parents/caregivers of children with diagnosed irritable bowel syndrome from across Canada about experiences, opinions and effects of IBS, with the intention of using the results to shape the organization’s programs, as well as future community awareness and advocacy among health care providers and policy makers and the general public.

Last month, the GI Society posted a report, Gastrointestinal Society 2016 Survey Results: Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS), which is available for download in PDF format from the link. Some highlights include the following:

There were a total of 2961 responses from all provinces and territories of Canada, approximately proportional to population. 2505 participants responded in English and 456 in French from the organization’s French-language mirror site. 86% of respondents were female, 14% male. 90% were between the ages of 30-69.

53% had had IBS for more than 10 years. 41% reported IBS-M (mixed subtype, formerly referred to as IBS-A for alternating), 35% IBS-D (diarrhea-predominant subtype), 18% IBS-C (constipation-predominant subtype) and 6% unsure. In a question rating pain in the previous 3 months on a 1-5 scale with 1 as no pain, and 5 as the worst pain, 4% chose 1, 20% chose 2, 39% chose 3, 28% chose 4 and 9% chose 5. Respondents were also asked to rate other common IBS symptom severity as never experience, mild, moderate, and severe.

According to the report, fewer than half of respondents have seen a gastroenterologist. Those who have consulted doctors for IBS mostly see general practitioners. 26% reported not seeing a doctor for IBS at least once a year. Of the remainder, the largest subgroups reported 1-2 visits or 3-5 visits. Small percentages in the single digits each reported 6-10 visits or 11 or more visits. 12% stated they had been hospitalized for IBS. 62% use two or more medications or treatments regularly. 16% stated they cannot afford prescribed treatments and 26% that they can only afford some. Medications commonly used for IBS pain are sufficiently effective for only about one-third. Only 21% of survey participants describe their symptoms as under control, 45% somewhat under control, 34% no symptoms under control. The report notes that these results are similar to a 2015 nationwide survey by the American Gastroenterological Association in the United States, IBS in America.

Most of the GI Society’s respondents also indicate co-existing medical conditions and/or quality of life effects. 83% report the need to limit their diet. 71% report anxiety at least some of the time with 27%  reporting an anxiety disorder diagnosis. 32% have a mood disorder, 27% gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), 24% sleep disorders, 15% fibromyalgia. 76% state that IBS interferes with everyday activities at least some of the time. 37% overall state that in an average month they cannot leave their homes at least some of the time, with higher percentages in the IBS-D subset.  46% of respondents who are employed and/or are students report that they miss time from work or school in an average month due to IBS.

The report concludes that there continue to be unmet treatment and quality of life needs for many Canadians with IBS and that in particular, IBS pain needs improved treatment options, as that remains a significant symptom for most people with IBS that is significantly associated with decreased quality of life. The report also states that the time between symptom onset and diagnosis and diagnosis and relief of symptoms needs to be shortened. This may be possible through increased collaboration between patients and physicians.

The GI Society is asking those who responded in the original survey to participate in a five question online followup survey. The original survey is now completed and no longer available for new replies, but the GI Society also invites those who did not have the opportunity to complete the original survey to answer the followup. At this time, January 29, 2017, the followup questions are open at the original survey link. No closing date for responses is indicated. Please address any questions about this survey directly to the GI Society

http://www.badgut.org/ibs-survey/

IBS Impact commends the Gastrointestinal Society for its efforts to gather and publicize the views of its constituency. We encourage  Canadian readers with IBS or IBS-affected minor children to continue to express and advocate for their needs and desires to the organization and their health care and community services providers and national, provincial and local policy makers through the followup survey and other means. We hope that the survey results amplify and catalyze positive changes for the IBS community in Canada, and by extension, worldwide.

 

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