7 Years and 8 Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) Awareness Months of Forward Motion

April 14, 2015

by Nina Pan, IBS Impact founder and primary blogger for IBS Impact.

Two years ago, on April 24, 2013, I wrote a post for IBS Awareness Month that began with some reflections on my personal experiences with IBS, as well as my motivations for IBS Impact. At that time, I had been living with IBS for over five years, and 2013 marked my sixth April with IBS. I observed how for me and  many other people with IBS dealing with the numerous actual or potential effects on a day to day basis often makes it difficult to recognize when progress is being made, either for us as individuals, or for the IBS community as a whole. I stated that it is only with the passage of time that I have begun to realize how some things are indeed changing, albeit slowly, for the better. In the rest of the post, I pointed out numerous areas in IBS research, IBS treatment, understanding of the impact of IBS on quality of life, increased societal support and advocacy that had seen concrete, positive change in just the five years and six IBS Awareness Months  I had personally experienced.

 On April 10, 2014, I reported in a similar vein on progress for the IBS community from the May 2013 to April 2014. Now, continuing the tradition during my own seventh year and eighth  IBS Awareness Month, once again, reviewing the archives of this blog, I can observe small steps forward in just a single year.

Progress in the science of IBS:

In the past year, this blog often commented on new areas of promising IBS research,  such as genetics, the microbiome, and new insights into symptom patterns of IBS. These varied endeavors are taking place in or with the involvement of many scientists from many countries. See other posts in the Research category of the blog sidebar to see the range of research news and clinical trial opportunities publicized over the most recent several months.

Progress in the diagnosis and treatment of IBS:

In August 2014, the American College of Gastroenterology issued its most recent evidence based review on the treatment of IBS. The last such document was published in 2009. In November 2014, the American Gastroenterological Association followed suit with its own updated medication guidelines.  In December 2014, the Rome Foundation, composed of an international group of leading functional gastrointestinal disorder experts met to finalize the Rome IV diagnostic criteria, which are expected to undergo the usual process for journal  publication by 2016. Most recently, in February 2015, the NICE guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of irritable bowel syndrome in adults in the United Kingdom were also updated from the previous 2008 version.

Several investigational medications and other non-pharmaceutical treatment options are always in the research pipeline in various parts of the world, and at least one, Rifaximin (brand name Xifaxan), previously denied approval in 2011 with a request for further studies for use in IBS with diarrhea, is currently awaiting a U.S. Food and Drug Administration decision on its most recent application. Next month, the FDA will hear directly from people with IBS and three other functional gastrointestinal disorders in a public meeting as part its Patient Focused Drug Development initiative.

Progress in understanding the impact of IBS and the barriers that remain:

In the past few months, the International Foundation for Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders, the Drossman Center for the Education and Practice of Biopsychosocial Care, and the University of Michigan have been inviting adults with IBS from the United States and Canada to take part in an online survey on experiences with the physician-patient relationship. It is hoped that the insights gained from this research can be used to improve overall care for people with IBS.

Progress in societal supports for people with IBS:

In August 2014, a Restroom Access Act was signed into law in Delaware. Our peers, primarily from the inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) community, are continuing decentralized but ongoing efforts to pass Restroom Access Acts, popularly known as Ally’s Law, in additional states. These individual state laws, which to the best of my knowledge now number sixteen, have the common goal of allowing people with medical conditions, including irritable bowel syndrome, that may cause urgent restroom needs, to use employee-only facilities in retail stores if no public restrooms are immediately available. Search the Ally’s Law tag in the right sidebar to see previous posts and other states where similar laws apply.

As noted on this blog on January 21, 2015, the IBS Network is presently making efforts to expand local, in-person self-help/support groups for people with IBS in the United Kingdom.

Progress in advocacy and awareness:

The International Foundation for Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders and its grassroots arm, the Digestive Health Alliance  (IFFGD/DHA)  continued in the past year to shepherd the Functional GI and Motility Disorders Research Enhancement Act (HR 842) through its second attempt at Congressional passage, with the support of IBS Impact and other groups and individuals. While the Act did not pass by the end of the 113th Congress in December 2014, it picked up bipartisan support of Representatives from several states. It is expected to reintroduced in the current 114th Congress under a different Act number this year. See the Legislation category, HR 842 and HR 2239 subcategories in the right sidebar of this blog for more on this history of this important Act.  IFFGD has also been an ongoing advocate for veterans, who are disproportionately at risk for functional gastrointestinal disorders like IBS.

The University of North Carolina Center for Functional GI and Motility Disorders continued its pioneering commitment to easily accessible public education on IBS and other functional gastrointestinal disorders with its June 2014 Patient Symposium, conducted live and online, allowing people all over the world to participate. It also briefly brought back its monthly Expert Updates, also by video.

Douglas Drossman, MD, MACG, the UNC Center’s retired co-founder and co-director has brought this same commitment to his present roles as the founder of Drossman Gastroenterology, the Drossman Center for the Education and Practice of Biopsychosocial Care and the president of the Rome Foundation, with an online webinar for people with IBS and families on the doctor-patient relationship later this week. This webinar is a collaboration among IFFGD, the Drossman Center and the American College of Gastroenterology. The IBS community is fortunate that Dr. Drossman’s work and voice as one of the foremost international experts in the field continue to be influential.

IBS Impact’s site hits for the main site, this blog and social media are holding steady or increasing overall. We have reached over 100 different countries and territories with this blog alone and the number of social media followers has hit previously unprecedented numbers this past year. Soon, we will be launching a redesigned and updated main website better reflecting present interests and needs of our diverse readership.

These are just a handful of examples of progress for the IBS community in the past year. Cumulatively, there are many more. Obviously, we still have very far to go before all people with IBS have all the medical and social supports that we need for fully productive lives, with or without IBS,  but we have come far as well. There are reasons for hope, especially if more of us do our part for self-advocacy and awareness in the years and IBS Awareness Months to come.


Representative King of New York Co-Sponsors HR 842 for Functional Gastrointestinal and Motility Disorders

September 11, 2014

UPDATE: 06/13/2015: HR 842 did not pass, but a similar bill HR 2311 is currently in the House of Representatives for 2015-2016. Please click on the HR 2311 sub-category on the right sidebar of this blog to see the relevant posts.

According to THOMAS, the Library of Congress legislative database, and IFFGD/the Digestive Health Alliance, Representatives Peter T. (Pete) King (R-NY-2) has recently signed on as a co-sponsor to the Functional Gastrointestinal and Motility Disorders Research Enhancement Act of 2013.

Representative King is serving his eleventh term in Congress, currently representing the 2nd District of New York, which was recently re-districted and currently encompasses parts of both Nassau and Suffolk Counties in central and South Shore Long Island, including the Townships of Hempstead, Oyster Bay, Babylon and Islip and most of Fire Island. According to Representative King’s official House website, he is currently a member of the Subcommittee on Homeland Security and has a record of supporting legislation concerning the military, veterans and health care.  As previously discussed on this blog on August 12, 2011 and August 25, 2011, military service members and veterans are at disproportionately high risk of functional gastrointestinal disorders like IBS, which are already very common in the general population.

If you are a constituent of Representative King, please take a few minutes to write or call him with your thanks for his support of HR 842 and the functional gastrointestinal and motility disorders community.

In officially supporting HR 842, Representative King joins the lead sponsor, Representative F. James Sensenbrenner, Jr. (R-WI-5) and co-sponsors, Representative James Moran (D-VA-8), Representative Julia Brownley (D-CA-26), Representative Bobby Rush (D-IL-1),  Representative Gwen Moore (D-WI-5), Representative Ron Kind (D-WI-3), Representative Susan Davis (D-CA-53),  Representative Peter Welch (D-VT), Representative James McGovern (D-MA-2), Representative Gerald Connolly (D-VA-11), Representative Louise Slaughter (D-NY-25), Representative Bill Posey (R-FL-8), and Representative Ed Perlmutter (D-CO-7), Representative Jim Himes (D-CT-4), Representative André Carson (D-IN-7), and Representative Mo Brooks (R-AL-5), Representative Richard Neal (D-MA-1), Representative David Price (D-NC-4) and Carol Shea-Porter (D-NH-1)  U.S. citizens residing in the districts of Representative King’s  colleagues listed here, please thank them as well.

According to the information on THOMAS, it appears that the bill is currently under consideration in the Subcommittee on Health. Click on the link above if you would like to see a list of its members.

U. S. citizens, if your Member of Congress is not yet a co-sponsor of HR 842 and you have not contacted him or her recently to ask for his or her support, please see the previous post from March 2, 2013  for links to the bill and more details on how to do so.  Often, it takes multiple attempts to elicit any interest from legislators, so if you do not receive a reply, do not hesitate to try again or to switch contact methods until you attract attention. Keep in mind that your Representative may be different from before because of the 2012 elections, district boundaries that may have been re-drawn, or if you have moved.

Your personal experiences as a person with IBS and/or other functional GI/motility disorders, or as a concerned family member, friend or colleague, are most effective in communicating to legislators and their staff that there are real human beings behind the statistics. However, even general expressions of support are helpful.

HR 842 is bipartisan legislation (supported by members of both parties) and according to IFFGD discussions with IBS Impact,  is “revenue-neutral,” meaning that there will be no additional taxes or spending added to the current federal deficit if it is enacted. Discretionary funds are available at the National Institutes of Health to be allocated if Congress directs NIH, through this Act, that functional gastrointestinal and motility disorders are a priority. Congress will only do so if we, as a community, are able to show them the importance of the research, education and FDA coordination provided for in HR 842.

NIH grants funding to researchers throughout the world, not just in the U.S., so in the long run, enactment of this Act may also benefit readers with IBS in other countries. Medical research also sometimes involves multinational teams of scientists, and in any case, study results are usually published globally, adding to the cumulative knowledge worldwide.

It is IBS Impact’s understanding that HR 842 will not require a debate or vote on the floor of the House of Representatives, and will pass as soon as it reaches 218 sponsor/cosponsors, or a simple majority of the House. In order for this milestone to be accomplished during the current Congress, the 113th,  the necessary number of sponsor/cosponsors must be reached by December 2014. Every two years, the Congressional membership will be different as a result of elections. Thus, if HR 842 has not passed by that time,  a similar bill will have to be reintroduced and the FGIMD community will have to start the process of gathering co-sponsors anew. This is what occurred with HR 2239 in 2012. While it is quite common for legislation of various sorts to take several Congresses to pass, our continuing advocacy now can increase awareness, build momentum and perhaps accelerate passage. It is in our hands.

Check back on this blog or join IBS Impact’s Facebook page or Twitter feed for further updates on HR 842 as they occur. Links to the social media sites can be found on the right sidebar of the blog.


Representatives Price of North Carolina and Shea-Porter of New Hampshire Co-Sponsor HR 842 for Functional Gastrointestinal and Motility Disorders

July 17, 2014

UPDATE: 06/13/2015: HR 842 did not pass, but a similar bill, HR 2311, is currently in the House of Representatives for 2015-2016. Please click on the HR 2311 sub-category on the right sidebar of this blog to see the relevant posts.

According to THOMAS, the Library of Congress legislative database, and IFFGD/the Digestive Health Alliance, Representatives David Price  (D-NC-4) and Carol Shea-Porter (D-NH-1) have recently signed on as co-sponsors to the Functional Gastrointestinal and Motility Disorders Research Enhancement Act of 2013.

Representative Price is currently serving his thirteenth non-consecutive term in Congress representing the 4th District of North Carolina, which was recently re-districted and currently encompasses much of the Triangle region in the central part of the state, including most of Durham and Orange Counties and parts of Alamance, Wake, Harnett, Chatham and Cumberland Counties. According to his official House website, Representative Price is currently a member of the Committee on Appropriations, where he supported increases in funding to the National Institutes of Health. He also is the Ranking Democrat on the Subcommittee on Homeland Security and  a member of the Subcommittee on Military Construction and Veterans Affairs. As previously discussed on this blog on August 12, 2011 and August 25, 2011, military service members and veterans are at disproportionately high risk of functional gastrointestinal disorders like IBS, which are already very common in the general population. In the 112th Congress in 2011-2012, Representative Price was also a co-sponsor of HR 2239, the previous version of this Act, which was not passed by the House of Representatives at that time. IBS Impact commends Representative Price’s continued support.

Representative Shea-Porter is currently serving her third non-consecutive term in Congress representing the 1st District of New Hampshire in the southeastern part of the state, encompassing most of greater Manchester, the Seacoast and the Lakes regions, including  all of Carroll and Stratford Counties, most of Belknap and Rockingham Counties and small portions of Grafton, Hillsborough and Merrimack Counties. Representative Shea-Porter, whose official House website, states she is a former military spouse, is a member of two subcommittees of the Committee on Armed Services. She also has a record of membership in several caucuses or supporting legislation related to various health and women’s issues. In most countries, women are also disproportionately affected by IBS.

If you are a constituent of Representative Price or Representative Shea-Porter. please take a few minutes to write or call with your thanks for their support of HR 842 and the functional gastrointestinal and motility disorders community.

In officially supporting HR 842, Representatives Price and Shea-Porter join the lead sponsor, Representative F. James Sensenbrenner, Jr. (R-WI-5) and co-sponsors, Representative James Moran (D-VA-8), Representative Julia Brownley (D-CA-26), Representative Bobby Rush (D-IL-1),  Representative Gwen Moore (D-WI-5), Representative Ron Kind (D-WI-3), Representative Susan Davis (D-CA-53),  Representative Peter Welch (D-VT), Representative James McGovern (D-MA-2), Representative Gerald Connolly (D-VA-11), Representative Louise Slaughter (D-NY-25), Representative Bill Posey (R-FL-8), and Representative Ed Perlmutter (D-CO-7), Representative Jim Himes (D-CT-4), Representative André Carson (D-IN-7), and Representative Mo Brooks (R-AL-5) and Representative Richard Neal (D-MA-1) U.S. citizens residing in the districts of Representative Price’s and Representative Shea-Porter’s  colleagues listed here, please thank them as well.

According to the information on THOMAS, it appears that the bill is currently under consideration in the Subcommittee on Health. Click on the link above if you would like to see a list of its members.

U. S. citizens, if your Member of Congress is not yet a co-sponsor of HR 842 and you have not contacted him or her recently to ask for his or her support, please see the previous post from March 2, 2013  for links to the bill and more details on how to do so.  Often, it takes multiple attempts to elicit any interest from legislators, so if you do not receive a reply, do not hesitate to try again or to switch contact methods until you attract attention. Keep in mind that your Representative may be different from before because of the 2012 elections, district boundaries that may have been re-drawn, or if you have moved.

Your personal experiences as a person with IBS and/or other functional GI/motility disorders, or as a concerned family member, friend or colleague, are most effective in communicating to legislators and their staff that there are real human beings behind the statistics. However, even general expressions of support are helpful.

HR 842 is bipartisan legislation (supported by members of both parties) and according to IFFGD discussions with IBS Impact,  is “revenue-neutral,” meaning that there will be no additional taxes or spending added to the current federal deficit if it is enacted. Discretionary funds are available at the National Institutes of Health to be allocated if Congress directs NIH, through this Act, that functional gastrointestinal and motility disorders are a priority. Congress will only do so if we, as a community, are able to show them the importance of the research, education and FDA coordination provided for in HR 842.

NIH grants funding to researchers throughout the world, not just in the U.S., so in the long run, enactment of this Act may also benefit readers with IBS in other countries. Medical research also sometimes involves multinational teams of scientists, and in any case, study results are usually published globally, adding to the cumulative knowledge worldwide.

It is IBS Impact’s understanding that HR 842 will not require a debate or vote on the floor of the House of Representatives, and will pass as soon as it reaches 218 sponsor/cosponsors, or a simple majority of the House. In order for this milestone to be accomplished during the current Congress, the 113th,  the necessary number of sponsor/cosponsors must be reached by December 2014. Every two years, the Congressional membership will be different as a result of elections. Thus, if HR 842 has not passed by that time,  a similar bill will have to be reintroduced and the FGIMD community will have to start the process of gathering co-sponsors anew. This is what occurred with HR 2239 in 2012. While it is quite common for legislation of various sorts to take several Congresses to pass, our continuing advocacy now can increase awareness, build momentum and perhaps accelerate passage. It is in our hands.

Check back on this blog or join IBS Impact’s Facebook page or Twitter feed for further updates on HR 842 as they occur. Links to the social media sites can be found on the right sidebar of the blog.


Representative Neal of Massachusetts Co-Sponsors HR 842 for Functional Gastrointestinal and Motility Disorders

July 3, 2014

UPDATE: 06/13/2015: HR 842 did not pass, but a similar bill, HR 2311, is currently in the House of Representatives for 2015-2016. Please click on the HR 2311 sub-category on the right sidebar of this blog to see the relevant posts.

According to THOMAS, the Library of Congress legislative database, and IFFGD/the Digestive Health Alliance, Representative Richard Neal (D-MA-1) has recently signed on as a co-sponsor to the Functional Gastrointestinal and Motility Disorders Research Enhancement Act of 2013.

Representative Neal is currently serving his thirteenth term in Congress, his first term representing Massachusetts’ recently redrawn 1st district,  which encompasses western and part of central Massachusetts, including all of Berkshire County, most of  Hampden Counties and parts of Franklin, Hampshire and Worcester Counties, including the cities and towns of Springfield, West Springfield, Holyoke, Pittsfield and  Westfield. According to Representative Neal’s official House website, he has a record of supporting health issues.

If you are a constituent of Representative Neal, please take a few minutes to write or call him with your thanks for his support of HR 842 and the functional gastrointestinal and motility disorders community.

In officially supporting HR 842, Representative Neal  joins the lead sponsor, Representative F. James Sensenbrenner, Jr. (R-WI-5) and co-sponsors, Representative James Moran (D-VA-8), Representative Julia Brownley (D-CA-26), Representative Bobby Rush (D-IL-1),  Representative Gwen Moore (D-WI-5), Representative Ron Kind (D-WI-3), Representative Susan Davis (D-CA-53),  Representative Peter Welch (D-VT), Representative James McGovern (D-MA-2), Representative Gerald Connolly (D-VA-11), Representative Louise Slaughter (D-NY-25), Representative Bill Posey (R-FL-8), and Representative Ed Perlmutter (D-C0-7), Representative Jim Himes (D-CT-4), Representative André Carson (D-IN-7), and Representative Mo Brooks (R-AL-5). U.S. citizens residing in the districts of Representative Neal’s colleagues listed here, please thank them as well.

According to the information on THOMAS, it appears that the bill is currently under consideration in the Subcommittee on Health. Click on the link above if you would like to see a list of its members.

U. S. citizens, if your Member of Congress is not yet a co-sponsor of HR 842 and you have not contacted him or her recently to ask for his or her support, please see the previous post from March 2, 2013  for links to the bill and more details on how to do so.  Often, it takes multiple attempts to elicit any interest from legislators, so if you do not receive a reply, do not hesitate to try again or to switch contact methods until you attract attention. Keep in mind that your Representative may be different from before because of the 2012 elections, district boundaries that may have been re-drawn, or if you have moved.

Your personal experiences as a person with IBS and/or other functional GI/motility disorders, or as a concerned family member, friend or colleague, are most effective in communicating to legislators and their staff that there are real human beings behind the statistics. However, even general expressions of support are helpful.

HR 842 is bipartisan legislation (supported by members of both parties) and according to IFFGD discussions with IBS Impact,  is “revenue-neutral,” meaning that there will be no additional taxes or spending added to the current federal deficit if it is enacted. Discretionary funds are available at the National Institutes of Health to be allocated if Congress directs NIH, through this Act, that functional gastrointestinal and motility disorders are a priority. Congress will only do so if we, as a community, are able to show them the importance of the research, education and FDA coordination provided for in HR 842.

NIH grants funding to researchers throughout the world, not just in the U.S., so in the long run, enactment of this Act may also benefit readers with IBS in other countries. Medical research also sometimes involves multinational teams of scientists, and in any case, study results are usually published globally, adding to the cumulative knowledge worldwide.

It is IBS Impact’s understanding that HR 842 will not require a debate or vote on the floor of the House of Representatives, and will pass as soon as it reaches 218 sponsor/cosponsors, or a simple majority of the House. In order for this milestone to be accomplished during the current Congress, the 113th,  the necessary number of sponsor/cosponsors must be reached by December 2014. Every two years, the Congressional membership will be different as a result of elections. Thus, if HR 842 has not passed by that time,  a similar bill will have to be reintroduced and the FGIMD community will have to start the process of gathering co-sponsors anew. This is what occurred with HR 2239 in 2012. While it is quite common for legislation of various sorts to take several Congresses to pass, our continuing advocacy now can increase awareness, build momentum and perhaps accelerate passage. It is in our hands.

Check back on this blog or join IBS Impact’s Facebook page or Twitter feed for further updates on HR 842 as they occur. Links to the social media sites can be found on the right sidebar of the blog.


Congressional Call-In Day for Functional Gastrointestinal and Motility Disorders Is June 17, 2014

June 8, 2014
Used with the permission of the International Foundation for Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders/the Digestive Health Alliance (IFFGD/DHA)

Used with the permission of the International Foundation for Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders/the Digestive Health Alliance (IFFGD/DHA)

IFFGD/the Digestive Health Alliance has scheduled its annual Congressional Call-In Day in support of HR 842, the Functional Gastrointestinal and Motility Disorders Research Enhancement Act of 2013, for Tuesday, June 17, 2014.

As of early June 2014, HR 842 is officially supported by 16 members of the U.S. House of Representatives, representing both political parties and 12 states.  They are the initial sponsor, Representative F. James Sensenbrenner, Jr. (R-WI-5) and co-sponsors, Representative James Moran (D-VA-8), Representative Julia Brownley (D-CA-26), Representative Bobby Rush (D-IL-1), Representative Gwen Moore (D-WI-5), Representative Ron Kind (D-WI-3), Representative Susan Davis (D-CA-53),  Representative Peter Welch (D-VT), Representative James McGovern (D-MA-2), Representative Gerald Connolly (D-VA-11), Representative Louise Slaughter (D-NY-25), Representative Bill Posey (R-FL-8), Representative Ed Perlmutter (D-C0-7), Representative Jim Himes (D-CT-4), Representative André Carson (D-IN-7), and Representative Mo Brooks (R-AL-5).

The upcoming 2014 Congressional Call-In Day is an excellent opportunity for constituents of current supporters to express their appreciation to their legislators, as well as  for U.S. citizens whose Representatives are not yet co-sponsors to advocate for their support. On June 17, IFFGD/DHA and other IBS sites, including IBS Impact, strongly encourage all U.S. citizens with all functional gastrointestinal or motility disorders (for example, irritable bowel syndrome, GERD, gastroparesis, chronic idiopathic psuedo-obstruction, Hirschsprung’s disease,  functional (recurrent) abdominal pain, cyclic vomiting syndrome, functional dyspepsia and many others, which collectively affect at least 25% of the population), concerned family members, friends, co-workers or classmates, health and human service professionals who work with people with functional GI or motility disorders, to call their Representatives about HR 842. A strong, unified presence by many voices on the same day will make an impression that will pave the way for the IFFGD/DHA’s delegation of self-advocates with functional GI or motility disorders and functional GI professionals who will travel to Washington, DC to advocate in person later this month on IFFGD/DHA Advocacy Day 2014.

If you know the member of the federal House of Representatives who represents you, the direct telephone number for his or her Washington, DC office can usually be found on his or her official website, which can be located by an Internet search of his or her name. Keep in mind that your Representative may be different from before because of the 2012 elections, district boundaries that may have been re-drawn, or if you have moved. If you are not sure who is your Representative, you can look up this information at  http://www.house.gov/representatives/find/ or call the U.S. Capitol switchboard at (202) 225-3121.

During business hours Eastern time on June 17, call your Representative’s office. Identify yourself as a constituent and give your name and the town or city in which you reside. Ask to speak to the staff member who deals with health issues. You may be asked for your street address or phone number. This is to confirm that you do live in the Representative’s district and/or to allow the office to contact you to follow up. If you are nervous, in advance of calling, write down notes for yourself or a short presentation to read. You do not have to be an excellent speaker, just a person that the legislator and his or her staff will see as a real person with real needs. Be polite, keep the conversation on topic and limited to a few minutes, and thank the staff person for his or her time. At a minimum, clearly state that you wish for the Representative to support HR 842, or express your thanks if he or she has already signed on.

Beyond this, you may choose to briefly explain your personal interest and/or experience with functional GI or motility disorders (for example, have had/family member has had irritable bowel syndrome for X years and has had difficulty finding appropriate treatment) and/or why functional GI and motility research and education provided for in HR 842 are important in general such as what a functional GI or motility disorder or  your specific one of interest, like IBS,  is, how many people it affects, usually affects both genders, all ages, all ethnic groups  that IBS/functional GI disorders are usually chronic. often misdiagnosed or mistreated and effective treatments, providers and local community services are limited. Thank the staff member again before ending your call. If the staff member who deals with health issues is not available, leave a brief message with the above details on voice mail or with the staff member who answers the phone. It is rare for such advocacy calls to result in an immediate commitment to a particular bill, but one purpose of Call-In Day is to create awareness of the needs that affect large numbers of people and momentum for increasing Congressional support.

For more information on HR 842 and advocacy strategies, including links to the bill, see the previous post from March 2, 2013 or click on the HR 842 category in the right sidebar of this blog to see all posts on this topic. Click the following link for DHA’s page for Call-In Day 2014

IBS Impact urges all U.S. citizen readers of this blog to participate in the important and easy advocacy effort and to spread the word among your supportive relatives, friends and functional GI and motility disorder groups.  The progress of HR 842 is in our hands.

Check back on this blog or join IBS Impact’s Facebook page or Twitter feed for further updates on HR 842 as they occur. Links to the social media sites can be found on the right sidebar of the blog.


Representative Brooks of Alabama Co-Sponsors HR 842 for Functional Gastrointestinal and Motility Disorders

May 21, 2014

UPDATE: 06/13/2015: HR 842 did not pass, but a similar bill, HR 2311, is currently in the House of Representatives for 2015-2016. Please click on the HR 2311 sub-category on the right sidebar of this blog to see the relevant posts.

According to THOMAS, the Library of Congress legislative database, and IFFGD/the Digestive Health Alliance, Representative Mo Brooks (R-AL-5) has recently signed on as a co-sponsor to the Functional Gastrointestinal and Motility Disorders Research Enhancement Act of 2013.

Representative Brooks is currently serving his second term in Congress. He represents Alabama’s 5th District,  which encompasses Colbert, Jackson, Lauderdale, Lawrence, Limestone, and Madison Counties, and a portion of Morgan County. Major cities within the district include Florence, Athens, Decatur, Huntsville and Scottsboro. According to Representative Brooks’ official House website, he is a member of the Armed Services Committee, and  has a record of supporting veterans’ issues. As previously discussed on this blog on August 12, 2011 and August 25, 2011, military service members and veterans are at disproportionately high risk for functional gastrointestinal disorders like IBS, which are already very common in the general population.

If you are a constituent of Representative Brooks, please take a few minutes to write or call him with your thanks for his support of HR 842 and the functional gastrointestinal and motility disorders community.

In officially supporting HR 842, Representative Brooks joins the lead sponsor, Representative F. James Sensenbrenner, Jr. (R-WI-5) and co-sponsors, Representative James Moran (D-VA-8), Representative Julia Brownley (D-CA-26), Representative Bobby Rush (D-IL-1),  Representative Gwen Moore (D-WI-5), Representative Ron Kind (D-WI-3), Representative Susan Davis (D-CA-53),  Representative Peter Welch (D-VT), Representative James McGovern (D-MA-2), Representative Gerald Connolly (D-VA-11), Representative Louise Slaughter (D-NY-25), Representative Bill Posey (R-FL-8), and Representative Ed Perlmutter (D-C0-7), Representative Jim Himes (D-CT-4) and Representative André Carson (D-IN-7). U.S. citizens residing in the districts of Representative Brooks’ colleagues listed here, please thank them as well.

According to the information on THOMAS, it appears that the bill is currently under consideration in the Subcommittee on Health. Click on the link above if you would like to see a list of its members.

U. S. citizens, if your Member of Congress is not yet a co-sponsor of HR 842 and you have not contacted him or her recently to ask for his or her support, please see the previous post from March 2, 2013  for links to the bill and more details on how to do so.  Often, it takes multiple attempts to elicit any interest from legislators, so if you do not receive a reply, do not hesitate to try again or to switch contact methods until you attract attention. Keep in mind that your Representative may be different from before because of the 2012 elections, district boundaries that may have been re-drawn, or if you have moved.

Your personal experiences as a person with IBS and/or other functional GI/motility disorders, or as a concerned family member, friend or colleague, are most effective in communicating to legislators and their staff that there are real human beings behind the statistics. However, even general expressions of support are helpful.

HR 842 is bipartisan legislation (supported by members of both parties) and according to IFFGD discussions with IBS Impact,  is “revenue-neutral,” meaning that there will be no additional taxes or spending added to the current federal deficit if it is enacted. Discretionary funds are available at the National Institutes of Health to be allocated if Congress directs NIH, through this Act, that functional gastrointestinal and motility disorders are a priority. Congress will only do so if we, as a community, are able to show them the importance of the research, education and FDA coordination provided for in HR 842.

NIH grants funding to researchers throughout the world, not just in the U.S., so in the long run, enactment of this Act may also benefit readers with IBS in other countries. Medical research also sometimes involves multinational teams of scientists, and in any case, study results are usually published globally, adding to the cumulative knowledge worldwide.

It is IBS Impact’s understanding that HR 842 will not require a debate or vote on the floor of the House of Representatives, and will pass as soon as it reaches 218 sponsor/cosponsors, or a simple majority of the House. In order for this milestone to be accomplished during the current Congress, the 113th,  the necessary number of sponsor/cosponsors must be reached by December 2014. Every two years, the Congressional membership will be different as a result of elections. Thus, if HR 842 has not passed by that time,  a similar bill will have to be reintroduced and the FGIMD community will have to start the process of gathering co-sponsors anew. This is what occurred with HR 2239 in 2012. While it is quite common for legislation of various sorts to take several Congresses to pass, our continuing advocacy now can increase awareness, build momentum and perhaps accelerate passage. It is in our hands.

Check back on this blog or join IBS Impact’s Facebook page or Twitter feed for further updates on HR 842 as they occur. Links to the social media sites can be found on the right sidebar of the blog.


Representative Carson of Indiana Co-Sponsors HR 842 for Functional Gastrointestinal and Motility Disorders

May 14, 2014

UPDATE: 06/13/2015: HR 842 did not pass, but a similar bill, HR 2311, is currently in the House of Representatives for 2015-2016. Please click on the HR 2311 sub-category on the right sidebar of this blog to see the relevant posts.

According to THOMAS, the Library of Congress legislative database, and IFFGD/the Digestive Health Alliance, Representative André Carson  (D-IN-7) has recently signed on as a co-sponsor to the Functional Gastrointestinal and Motility Disorders Research Enhancement Act of 2013.

Representative Carson, who was first elected the House of Representatives in an special election in 2008, is now serving his third full term in Congress. He represents Indiana’s 7th District in the central part of the state, which encompasses most of Marion County and the city of Indianapolis. According to Representative Carson’s official House website,  he currently holds the position of senior Democratic whip and is a member of the Armed Services Committee, and  has a record of supporting health care and veterans’ issues. As previously discussed on this blog on August 12, 2011 and August 25, 2011, military service members and veterans are at disproportionately high risk for functional gastrointestinal disorders like IBS, which are already very common in the general population.

If you are a constituent of Representative Carson, please take a few minutes to write or call him with your thanks for his support of HR 842 and the functional gastrointestinal and motility disorders community.

In officially supporting HR 842, Representative Carson joins the lead sponsor, Representative F. James Sensenbrenner, Jr. (R-WI-5) and co-sponsors, Representative James Moran (D-VA-8), Representative Julia Brownley (D-CA-26), Representative Bobby Rush (D-IL-1),  Representative Gwen Moore (D-WI-5), Representative Ron Kind (D-WI-3), Representative Susan Davis (D-CA-53),  Representative Peter Welch (D-VT), Representative James McGovern (D-MA-2), Representative Gerald Connolly (D-VA-11), Representative Louise Slaughter (D-NY-25), Representative Bill Posey (R-FL-8), and Representative Ed Perlmutter (D-C0-7) and Representative Jim Himes (D-CT-4)  U.S. citizens residing in the districts of Representative Carson’s colleagues listed here, please thank them as well.

According to the information on THOMAS, it appears that the bill is currently under consideration in the Subcommittee on Health. Click on the link above if you would like to see a list of its members.

U. S. citizens, if your Member of Congress is not yet a co-sponsor of HR 842 and you have not contacted him or her recently to ask for his or her support, please see the previous post from March 2, 2013  for links to the bill and more details on how to do so.  Often, it takes multiple attempts to elicit any interest from legislators, so if you do not receive a reply, do not hesitate to try again or to switch contact methods until you attract attention. Keep in mind that your Representative may be different from before because of the 2012 elections, district boundaries that may have been re-drawn, or if you have moved.

Your personal experiences as a person with IBS and/or other functional GI/motility disorders, or as a concerned family member, friend or colleague, are most effective in communicating to legislators and their staff that there are real human beings behind the statistics. However, even general expressions of support are helpful.

HR 842 is bipartisan legislation (supported by members of both parties) and according to IFFGD discussions with IBS Impact,  is “revenue-neutral,” meaning that there will be no additional taxes or spending added to the current federal deficit if it is enacted. Discretionary funds are available at the National Institutes of Health to be allocated if Congress directs NIH, through this Act, that functional gastrointestinal and motility disorders are a priority. Congress will only do so if we, as a community, are able to show them the importance of the research, education and FDA coordination provided for in HR 842.

NIH grants funding to researchers throughout the world, not just in the U.S., so in the long run, enactment of this Act may also benefit readers with IBS in other countries. Medical research also sometimes involves multinational teams of scientists, and in any case, study results are usually published globally, adding to the cumulative knowledge worldwide.

It is IBS Impact’s understanding that HR 842 will not require a debate or vote on the floor of the House of Representatives, and will pass as soon as it reaches 218 sponsor/cosponsors, or a simple majority of the House. In order for this milestone to be accomplished during the current Congress, the 113th,  the necessary number of sponsor/cosponsors must be reached by December 2014. Every two years, the Congressional membership will be different as a result of elections. Thus, if HR 842 has not passed by that time,  a similar bill will have to be reintroduced and the FGIMD community will have to start the process of gathering co-sponsors anew. This is what occurred with HR 2239 in 2012. While it is quite common for legislation of various sorts to take several Congresses to pass, our continuing advocacy now can increase awareness, build momentum and perhaps accelerate passage. It is in our hands.

Check back on this blog or join IBS Impact’s Facebook page or Twitter feed for further updates on HR 842 as they occur. Links to the social media sites can be found on the right sidebar of the blog.