Registries for Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) Research Volunteers Created in the United Kingdom and Australia

September 30, 2017

In recent weeks, IBS Impact has learned that two separate entities, the County Durham and Darlington NHS Foundation Trust in the United Kingdom, and Macquarie University Faculties of Human Sciences and Medicine and Health Sciences in Sydney, Australia have established new, secure registries for those who are interested in volunteering for research studies.

The Macquarie registry is for all adults with any functional gastrointestinal disorder  IBS is the most common FGID. Information can be found here.  Macquarie University Functional Gastrointestinal Disorder Research Volunteer Registry.

The County Durham and Darlington NHS Foundation Trust registry is specific to IBS and is also limited to adults at this time. According to a September 29, 2017 announcement on the NHS National Institute of Health Research site.  it is part of a five year study to encourage those with IBS to be aware of and seek care and to increase participation in clinical trials. If the registry succeeds, the hope is to expand it nationwide in the future. The official website for the service, to be known as Contact ME-IBS, is linked here.

In each case, placing one’s name and contact details on the registry does not guarantee that one will be contacted or be eligible for any specific research study, as requirements for volunteers vary with each individual study. Similarly, there is no obligation to participate in a specific study if contacted. It is simply an expression of possible future interest, allowing researchers to be aware of and efficiently reach out to potential participants willing to be recruited within the IBS/functional GI disorders community.

IBS Impact welcomes researchers affiliated with academic, medical or pharmaceutical entities, or reputable organizations representing IBS or related or commonly overlapping conditions, to contact us directly with additional registries, studies or surveys they wish to be considered for posting. A contact form is available on the main IBS Impact website.

IBS Impact makes these announcements available for general information, and encourages its members and site visitors to make their own individual, informed choices about their potential participation. Additional studies can be found by clicking on the Research– Clinical Trials sub-category in the right sidebar of this blog on our main website IBS studies page. Please be sure to check the date at the top or bottom of a given post, as many posts from this blog remain visible in search engines for several years, and studies stop accepting volunteers or conclude the trials after a period of time. IBS Impact, as an entity, is not directly affiliated with any research sponsor or organization and receives no funding from any source for studies, surveys or links we feature on this blog, the main site or social media.


Online Study: Cognitive Mediators of Bowel Discomfort, Swinburne University, Australia, August 2017

August 12, 2017

The following study currently seeking men and women at least 18 years old with gastrointestinal conditions was received directly from the research team and is posted at their invitation. We are advised that the study has received institutional ethical approval. All information available to IBS Impact is below and at the study link. Please address any further questions or concerns directly to the research team at the phone number or email address given in the description.

Swinburne University
Do psychological concerns drive your bowel discomfort – help us develop a scale to better measure these processes.
Psychological distress and gastrointestinal symptoms commonly occur together and are frequently reported in community samples. Your responses will help us better understand how thinking patterns impact upon gastrointestinal discomfort. Further your participation will also help us to develop a new scale that can help better identify and target psychological processes associated with gastrointestinal discomfort.  The study involves completing an online questionnaire which should take approximately 60 minutes to complete.

Go into the draw to win 1 of 4 $100AUS Amazon.com vouchers
At the end of the study you are welcome to add your email address (stored independently from the questionnaire data) in order to go into a draw to win 1 of 4 $100AUS Amazon.com vouchers. Winners will be drawn on the 31st of October 2017.

Who can participate?
Anyone over the age of 18 is eligible to participate in the study.
How to participate?
To participate, please click on the link below:
https://swinburnefhad.au1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_1LK9FqocoRelzCZ

For more information, please contact the research team:
Principal Investigator: Dr Simon Knowles, (03) 9214 8206, email: sknowles@swin.edu.au
Other investigators involved: Dr Pragalathan Apputhurai (Lecturer in Statistics), Dr Rebecca Burgell (Consultant Gastroenterologist, The Alfred Hospital), Ms Sarina Cook (Research Assistant) & Professor Laurie Keefer (Health Psychologist, Susan and Leonard Feinstein IBD Clinical Center, New York).

IBS Impact welcomes researchers affiliated with academic, medical or pharmaceutical entities, or reputable organizations representing IBS or related or commonly overlapping conditions, to contact us directly with additional studies or surveys they wish to be considered for posting. A contact form is available on the main IBS Impact website.

IBS Impact makes these announcements available for general information, and encourages its members and site visitors to make their own individual, informed choices about their potential participation. Additional studies can be found by clicking on the Research– Clinical Trials sub-category in the right sidebar of this blog on our main website IBS studies page. Please be sure to check the date at the top or bottom of a given post, as many posts from this blog remain visible in search engines for several years, and studies stop accepting volunteers or conclude the trials after a period of time. IBS Impact, as an entity, is not directly affiliated with any research sponsor or organization and receives no funding from any source for studies, surveys or links we feature on this blog, the main site or social media.


Online Study: Thought Impact Scale, University of North Carolina, May 2017

May 30, 2017

The following online study conducted by Olafur Palsson, PsyD, psychologist, professor and researcher at the University of North Carolina Center for Functional GI and Motility Disorders, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, was received recently via social media. Dr. Palsson is a leading international researcher of IBS and its psychological aspects. The current study is not specific to IBS or any other chronic medical condition, and study volunteers need not have a medical condition, but if the Thought Impact Scale is validated through this and other research, it has potential applications for psychological interventions for IBS and other conditions.

Dr. Palsson is seeking adult volunteers aged 18 or over who are fluent in English and reside in the United States to complete two 25 minute surveys 30 days apart. You must be willing to provide him with your first name and an email address so that he can send a participant code number and password, but responses to the surveys themselves are anonymous and cannot be linked in the study database to personally identifying information.

The italicized paragraphs below are a direct, complete quotation of the details available on the study website, which is linked below the italicized portion. The website also includes a video of Dr. Palsson personally describing the intended research.  Please address any additional questions or concerns about the study directly to Dr. Palsson at opalsson@med.unc.edu

HOW MUCH DOES YOUR SUBCONSCIOUS MIND INFLUENCE YOU?

Participate in an online research study and get answers to that question.

Dr. Olafur Palsson in the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine is testing a new questionnaire, called the Thought Impact Scale, which is designed to measure the degree to which subconscious (or non-conscious) mental functions affect people’s conscious behaviors, feelings and life experiences in everyday life. This online study will evaluate how the new questionnaire scores relates to various personal life experiences and characteristics, and assess the reliability and internal consistency of the questionnaire.
Whether you believe you are influenced a lot by your subconscious mind or only a little bit or even not at all, you are invited to participate in this study.

Participation requires:

Completing online surveys twice, about 30 days apart (takes about 25 minutes each time).
Being at least 18 years old, living in the United States and being fluent in English.

In exchange for your participation, you will:

Receive a personal report of your questionnaire results and their meaning. This report will include your scores on the new Thought Impact Scale and other questionnaires used in the study, how those scores compare in general with those of people in the study sample, and what the scores seem to mean about how much connection you have with your subconscious mind and how they relate to other main findings in the study.
Be entered into a drawing for 5 Amazon gift cards of $25 each
Receive a copy of the abstracts of all scientific papers that are published with the findings of this research
http://www.thoughtimpactscale.com

IBS Impact welcomes researchers affiliated with academic, medical or pharmaceutical entities, or reputable organizations representing IBS or related or commonly overlapping conditions, to contact us directly with additional studies or surveys they wish to be considered for posting. A contact form is available on the main IBS Impact website.

IBS Impact makes these announcements available for general information, and encourages its members and site visitors to make their own individual, informed choices about their potential participation. Additional studies can be found by clicking on the Research– Clinical Trials sub-category in the right sidebar of this blog on our main website IBS studies page. Please be sure to check the date at the top or bottom of a given post, as many posts from this blog remain visible in search engines for several years, and studies stop accepting volunteers or conclude the trials after a period of time. IBS Impact, as an entity, is not directly affiliated with any research sponsor or organization and receives no funding from any source for studies, surveys or links we feature on this blog, the main site or social media.


April is Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) Awareness Month 2017

April 1, 2017

April is Irritable Bowel Syndrome Awareness Month. IBS affects, depending on the source, at least 25 million and perhaps up to 58 million women, men and children in the United States and anywhere from 9-23% of the population in different countries on every continent of the world.  In the U.S, this prevalence exceeds that of diabetes, chronic kidney disease, asthma, adults with chronic heart disease, and, by far, inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), with which IBS is often confused. IBS Impact stands in solidarity with what Olafur Palsson, PsyD, full professor and leading researcher at the University of North Carolina Center for Functional GI and Motility Disorders once estimated as half a billion people with IBS around the globe. As noted in the January 10, 2012 post on this blog, in 2011, a Rome Foundation working team estimated that 40% of us are mildly affected, 35% moderately affected and 25% severely affected, with the last two groups significantly larger than that same group of professionals had previously thought.

Unlike awareness weeks and months for these and other common health conditions, it is often difficult to know this unless one follows certain IBS sites, but as time goes on, awareness gradually increases. In 2012, this blog  first published a version of this post as  “10 Things We Can Do for IBS Awareness This Month and Every Month,”  which remains one of the most popular single posts in the history of this blog.  That post has been revised and updated as needed every year since. Here are 10 possible strategies for how people with IBS in any country can increase awareness of IBS. Readers of this blog who are relatives and friends, with the permission of the person with IBS, feel free to help the cause too.

1) If they do not already know, talk to your family, friends, coworkers, classmates and medical providers about IBS. Having IBS is often an isolating experience, and some people with IBS who have “come out of the closet” have found that the stress of hiding and worrying about who knew and how much they knew actually triggered worse symptoms.  No, not everyone will “get it” and that can be hurtful or tiring, but people without IBS will never learn to understand unless we are willing to tell them. Some of them will help you and it may be the people you least expect. Given that IBS is the most common functional gastrointestinal disorder with prevalence anywhere from 9-23% in different countries worldwide, it’s very likely that some people  you tell will also have IBS or loved ones with IBS. The IBS Impact main website has an entire page of articles specifically for family and friends. Many past posts on this blog are also tagged for this subject, and can be found by using the search box on the right sidebar.

2) If you find the IBS Impact website or blog or any other reputable IBS site useful and interesting, share it with your family and friends, other people with IBS and your health care providers, especially those not currently active in the IBS community.  Knowledge is power. The more people who have good information and resources rather than outdated misconceptions and quacks, the better off we will be as individuals and as a group. IBS Impact also posts to its Twitter and Facebook pages several times month with scientifically reputable articles, resource links, clinical trial and advocacy opportunities and encouragement from sources all over the globe. If you use these social media platforms, your likes, comments and shares are a quick and low-effort way to participate in IBS awareness and spread the word very quickly.

3) If you’re not comfortable being public, you can still quietly distribute information in public places. IBS Impact has business cards with our logo available free for the asking. IFFGD/the Digestive Health Alliance has free downloadable awareness posters and other resources. The Gastrointestinal Society, in Canada, distributes free information packets and pamphlets that can be ordered online and mailed to addresses within Canada.  The IBS Network in the United Kingdom also offers a variety of IBS fact sheets to its paid members. Leave these materials in public displays or bulletin boards in community centers, libraries, medical offices and hospitals, pharmacies, banks, post offices, college campuses, wherever many people go every day.

4) Volunteer to share your story on the IBS Impact sites by using the contact links on the main website. We welcome diverse perspectives from people with IBS and their families and friends, and hope to be welcoming guest bloggers this month. Because IBS Impact encourages greater openness about IBS, we prefer to be able to post at least your first name and country of residence. IFFGD also accepts personal stories for its websites, anonymously or with names. IFFGD also occasionally quotes people with IBS in its publications.

5) Interact with the media. When there is coverage of IBS-related topics in mainstream print or broadcast stories or blogs, send or post your comments and corrections. This lets the media and other readers, viewers or listeners know we are out here as a community and that we care about how IBS is portrayed. IFFGD occasionally gets requests from the media to interview affected people. If you are interested, let IFFGD know that it can contact you. The IBS Network also sometimes publicizes requests from UK-specific media. For a past discussion of the media and IBS, see the November 6, 2011  post. Read about an advocacy success with a major U.S. media outlet in the January 20, 2014 blog post.

6) Participate in a research study so that scientists become more aware of our needs. Some studies are online or through the mail or phone. We regularly list some open studies on this blog, and on the main website, and/or share them on social media,  and many of the resources we link do as well.

7) IBS Impact is not a charity, but consider donating to one of the GI-related organizations or research facilities in your country. Many are listed on our links and research pages of the main site. It is very important for all non-profits to show that they are supported by their own constituency (the people whom they represent) when they approach other funding sources.  It is true that many IBSers don’t have a lot of money to spare, but even small amounts help. Seeral years ago, one person with IBS stated that if every person with IBS in just the U.S, the U.K. and Australia alone committed a dollar or pound a month, we’d have over a billion a year. If you’d like, have a fundraiser. IFFGD and other charitable organizations are generally glad to assist their supporters in these efforts. For more on why financial support to IBS entities is important, see this July 22, 2011  post and its August 25, 2014 followup.

8) If you absolutely cannot donate directly, use Goodsearch/Goodshop (in the U.S.)  or iGive  (in the U.S. or Canada) or Everyclick (in the U.K.) as your search engines or online shopping portals on behalf of the gastrointestinal charity of your choice. These sites all work slightly differently, but participating merchants designate percentages of each transaction to specific organizations you indicate. It doesn’t look like much each time, but the amount adds up if you use them consistently. Nothing extra comes out of your own pocket, and the charities do get the money.

9) Write to legislators or policy makers to support issues of importance to the IBS community. IFFGD can help U.S. citizens with current U.S. legislation of concern to functional GI and motility disorders. If you prefer not to go through that organization, you can do so yourself. Often there are separate state issues as well, which, when possible, we attempt to publicize on this blog. The IBS Network occasionally posts U.K. specific advocacy on its website and social media.

10) If you’re ambitious, organize an awareness event, especially those of you who are students or health professionals. Talk to a health professions class or go to a health fair. For another discussion of why IBS awareness is important, see this July 9, 2011 post. GI organizations, including the ones listed above, are often happy to assist their supporters with grassroots efforts if desired.

There are many more than 10 possible ways to advance the cause of IBS awareness worldwide. IBS Impact was founded on the belief that awareness is an ongoing process that should not just happen one month a year, so don’t just restrict yourself to April. But every action, small or large, multiplied by many people with IBS and our supporters moves us closer to a time when IBS is widely understood by the general public and when the medical and social needs of people with IBS as a community can be more easily met.


Online Clinical Trial: The Effects of Food on IBS and IBD, Northwestern and Rush Universities, July 2016

July 24, 2016

The following online clinical trial seeking adult volunteers with either irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) or any form of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) was received recently via the social media of Oak Park Behavioral Medicine located in suburban Chicago. Oak Park Behavioral Medicine is a private practice partnership of psychologist, Tiffany Taft, PsyD and social worker, Stephanie Horgan, LCSW. They specialize in providing psychological care to adults and children with chronic health conditions, including IBS and IBD. Dr Taft, who is also associated with Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine as a researcher into the psychosocial aspects of chronic gastrointestinal conditions, previously authored a guest post about stigma and IBS especially for this blog on April 15, 2013.

The italicized paragraphs below are a direct, complete quotation of all details available to IBS Impact at this time. Please address any questions or concerns about the study directly to Dr. Taft at the email address in the description.

Dr. Taft is collaborating with GI docs at Northwestern and Rush University to evaluate how food and diet treatments may affect the day-to-day lives of patients with Crohn’s Disease, ulcerative colitis, indeterminate colitis, or irritable bowel syndrome. If you’re interested, please read on…

My name is Dr. Darren Brenner and I’m an Assistant Professor at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine. We are doing a research study to evaluate the experiences patients diagnosed with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) or inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) have with food choices and, if applicable, using diet to treat their digestive symptoms. The title of the study is “Food related quality of life in irritable bowel syndrome and inflammatory bowel disease” (NU Study STU00202950). We are looking for 300 adults. If you’re between 18 and 70 years old and have been diagnosed with IBS or IBD, you are eligible to participate.

If you are interested, please email Dr. Tiffany Taft at ttaft@northwestern.edu and you will receive an email with the study website link as well as a unique participant ID and password. If you agree to participate, you will be asked to answer several questionnaires about you, your IBS or IBD treatments, your experience with the food and diet treatments, and your mood. Your participation should take about 60 minutes. Participants may enter a drawing to win one (1) $50.00 Amazon gift card once they have completed the study. Thank you!

IBS Impact welcomes researchers affiliated with academic, medical or pharmaceutical entities, or reputable organizations representing IBS or related or commonly overlapping conditions, to contact us directly with additional studies or surveys they wish to be considered for posting. A contact form is available on the main IBS Impact website.

IBS Impact makes these announcements available for general information, and encourages its members and site visitors to make their own individual, informed choices about their potential participation. Additional studies can be found by clicking on the Research– Clinical Trials sub-category in the right sidebar of this blog on our main website IBS studies page. Please be sure to check the date at the top or bottom of a given post, as many posts from this blog remain visible in search engines for several years, and studies stop accepting volunteers or conclude the trials after a period of time. IBS Impact, as an entity, is not directly affiliated with any research sponsor or organization and receives no funding from any source for studies, surveys or links we feature on this blog, the main site or social media.


April is Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) Awareness Month 2016

April 1, 2016

April is Irritable Bowel Syndrome Awareness Month. IBS affects, depending on the source, at least 25 million and perhaps up to 58 million women, men and children in the United States and anywhere from 9-23% of the population in different countries on every continent of the world.  In the U.S, this prevalence exceeds that of diabetes, chronic kidney disease, asthma, adults with chronic heart disease, and, by far, inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), with which IBS is often confused. IBS Impact stands in solidarity with what Olafur Palsson, PsyD, full professor and leading researcher at the University of North Carolina Center for Functional GI and Motility Disorders once estimated as half a billion people with IBS around the globe. As noted in the January 10, 2012 post on this blog, in 2011, a Rome Foundation working team estimated that 40% of us are mildly affected, 35% moderately affected and 25% severely affected, with the last two groups significantly larger than that same group of professionals had previously thought.

Unlike awareness weeks and months for these and other common health conditions, it is often difficult to know this unless one follows certain IBS sites, but as time goes on, awareness gradually increases. In 2012, this blog  first published a version of this post as  “10 Things We Can Do for IBS Awareness This Month and Every Month,”  which remains one of the most popular single posts in the history of this blog.  That post has been revised and updated as needed every year since. Here are 10 possible strategies for how people with IBS in any country can increase awareness of IBS. Readers of this blog who are relatives and friends, with the permission of the person with IBS, feel free to help the cause too.

1) If they do not already know, talk to your family, friends, coworkers, classmates and medical providers about IBS. Having IBS is often an isolating experience, and some people with IBS who have “come out of the closet” have found that the stress of hiding and worrying about who knew and how much they knew actually triggered worse symptoms.  No, not everyone will “get it” and that can be hurtful or tiring, but people without IBS will never learn to understand unless we are willing to tell them. Some of them will help you and it may be the people you least expect. Given that IBS is the most common functional gastrointestinal disorder with prevalence anywhere from 9-23% in different countries worldwide, it’s very likely that some people  you tell will also have IBS or loved ones with IBS. The IBS Impact main website has an entire page of articles specifically for family and friends. Many past posts on this blog are also tagged for this subject, and can be found by using the search box on the right sidebar.

2) If you find the IBS Impact website or blog or any other reputable IBS site useful and interesting, share it with your family and friends, other people with IBS and your health care providers, especially those not currently active in the IBS community.  Knowledge is power. The more people who have good information and resources rather than outdated misconceptions and quacks, the better off we will be as individuals and as a group. IBS Impact also posts to its Twitter and Facebook pages several times month with scientifically reputable articles, resource links, clinical trial and advocacy opportunities and encouragement from sources all over the globe. If you use these social media platforms, your likes, comments and shares are a quick and low-effort way to participate in IBS awareness and spread the word very quickly.

3) If you’re not comfortable being public, you can still quietly distribute information in public places. IBS Impact has business cards with our logo available free for the asking. IFFGD/the Digestive Health Alliance has free downloadable awareness posters and other resources. The Irritable Bowel Syndrome Self Help and Support Group online forum based in Canada that draws visitors from many countries worldwide, has a downloadable brochure in English explaining IBS to those who do not have it, with translations in Simplified and Traditional Chinese, Swedish and German on the website. The Gastrointestinal Society, also in Canada, distributes free information packets and pamphlets that can be ordered online and mailed to addresses within Canada.  The IBS Network in the United Kingdom also offers a variety of IBS fact sheets to its paid members. Leave these materials in public displays or bulletin boards in community centers, libraries, medical offices and hospitals, pharmacies, banks, post offices, college campuses, wherever many people go every day.

4) Volunteer to share your story on the IBS Impact sites by using the contact links on the main website. We welcome diverse perspectives from people with IBS and their families and friends, and hope to be welcoming guest bloggers this month. Because IBS Impact encourages greater openness about IBS, we prefer to be able to post at least your first name and country of residence. IFFGD also accepts personal stories for its websites, anonymously or with names. IFFGD also occasionally quotes people with IBS in its publications.

5) Interact with the media. When there is coverage of IBS-related topics in mainstream print or broadcast stories or blogs, send or post your comments and corrections. This lets the media and other readers, viewers or listeners know we are out here as a community and that we care about how IBS is portrayed. IFFGD occasionally gets requests from the media to interview affected people. If you are interested, let IFFGD know that it can contact you. The IBS Network also sometimes publicizes requests from UK-specific media. For a past discussion of the media and IBS, see the November 6, 2011  post. Read about an advocacy success with a major U.S. media outlet in the January 20, 2014 blog post.

6) Participate in a research study so that scientists become more aware of our needs. Some studies are online or through the mail or phone. We regularly list some open studies on this blog, and on the main website, and/or share them on social media,  and many of the resources we link do as well.

7) IBS Impact is not a charity, but consider donating to one of the GI-related organizations or research facilities in your country. Many are listed on our links and research pages of the main site. It is very important for all non-profits to show that they are supported by their own constituency (the people whom they represent) when they approach other funding sources.  It is true that many IBSers don’t have a lot of money to spare, but even small amounts help. A few years ago, one person with IBS stated that if every person with IBS in just the U.S, the U.K. and Australia alone committed a dollar or pound a month, we’d have over a billion a year. If you’d like, have a fundraiser. IFFGD and other charitable organizations are generally glad to assist their supporters in these efforts. For more on why financial support to IBS entities is important, see this July 22, 2011  post and its August 25, 2014 followup.

8) If you absolutely cannot donate directly, use Goodsearch (in the U.S.)  or iGive  (in the U.S. or Canada) or Everyclick (in the U.K.) as your search engines or online shopping portals on behalf of the gastrointestinal charity of your choice. These sites all work slightly differently, but participating merchants designate percentages of each transaction to specific organizations you indicate. It doesn’t look like much each time, but the amount adds up if you use them consistently. Nothing extra comes out of your own pocket, and the charities do get the money.

9) Write to legislators or policy makers to support issues of importance to the IBS community. IFFGD can help U.S. citizens with current U.S. legislation of concern to functional GI and motility disorders. If you prefer not to go through that organization, you can do so yourself. Often there are separate state issues as well, which, when possible, we attempt to publicize on this blog. The IBS Network occasionally posts U.K. specific advocacy on its website and social media.

10) If you’re ambitious, organize an awareness event, especially those of you who are students or health professionals. Talk to a health professions class or go to a health fair. For another discussion of why IBS awareness is important, see this July 9, 2011 post. GI organizations, including the ones listed above, are often happy to assist their supporters with grassroots efforts if desired.

There are many more than 10 possible ways to advance the cause of IBS awareness worldwide. IBS Impact was founded on the belief that awareness is an ongoing process that should not just happen one month a year, so don’t just restrict yourself to April. But every action, small or large, multiplied by many people with IBS and our supporters moves us closer to a time when IBS is widely understood by the general public and when the medical and social needs of people with IBS as a community can be more easily met.


Clinical Trial: Fecal Microbiota Transplant for Adult IBS-D, Montefiore Medical Center, New York, February 2016

February 28, 2016

Montefiore Medical Center, a major academic medical center in Bronx, New York (New York City) is currently recruiting men and women, ages 19-65 with physician-diagnosed, (Rome III criteria) irritable bowel syndrome with diarrhea (IBS-D) for a clinical trial to determine the possible  safety, feasibility and effectiveness of fecal microbiota transplantation for IBS-D. Potential volunteers must have moderate to severe symptoms that have not been managed effectively with existing treatments, not be currently pregnant or nursing, and not have been treated with antibiotics within 3 months of study enrollment. There are several additional medical exclusion criteria that may also apply, as listed on ClinicalTrials.gov.

The study involves randomized assignment to oral capsules of fecal microbiota from extensively screened donor stool or placebo taken for three days.  All volunteers will then cross over to the other group after 12 weeks and be followed for a total of 6 months.

If you are interested in volunteering to participate, please  contact Olga C. Aroniadis, MD,  at 718-920-4846,  or fmtibsd@gmail.com. The study’s ClinicalTrials.gov identifer is  NCT02329547.

This information is summarized from a posting by IFFGD and from the study listing at ClinicalTrials.gov. Montefiore Medical Center is one of three sites conducting this trial, with two others in New York City and Hamden, Connecticut given in the Clinical Trials.gov listing. Please address any questions or concerns directly to the research center.

We welcome researchers affiliated with academic, medical or pharmaceutical entities, or reputable organizations representing IBS or related or commonly overlapping conditions, to contact us directly with additional studies or surveys they wish to be considered for posting. A contact form is available on the main IBS Impact website.

IBS Impact makes these announcements available for general information, and encourages its members and site visitors to make their own individual, informed choices about their potential participation.  IBS Impact, as an entity, is not directly affiliated with any research sponsor or organization and receives no funding from any source for studies, surveys or links we feature on this blog, the main site or social media.