ACTION ALERT: Functional Gastrointestinal and Motility Disorders Research Enhancement Act of 2017 (HR 1187)

March 21, 2017

In early March 2017,  the International Foundation for Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders (IFFGD) publicly made known that the Functional Gastrointestinal and Motility Disorders Research Enhancement Act of 2017, also known as HR 1187 was introduced in the United States House of Representatives on February 16, 2017.  HR 1187 addresses public awareness efforts and research funding for functional gastrointestinal and motility disorders like IBS, as well as improved efforts at coordination of research efforts and prescription drug approval among federal entities and the functional GI and motility disorder community.

This is similar to the bill that was known in the 112th Congress in 2011-2012 as HR 2239, in the 113th Congress in 2013-2014 as HR 842 and in the 114th Congress as HR 2311. Because the composition of Congress changes with each federal election, it is not unusual for legislation that does not pass to be reintroduced in future sessions under different bill numbers depending on the date of introduction.

IBS Impact thanks IFFGD  for its ongoing work of many years in bringing this bill to fruition, and urges readers who are U.S. citizens to advocate for this landmark legislation on behalf of people with IBS and related disorders. As with the previous versions of the Act, HR 1187, was introduced by Representative F. James Sensenbrenner, Jr. (R-WI-5) as the initial sponsor. On March 13, 2017, Representative Mark Pocan (D-WI-2), a co-sponsor of HR 2311 in the previous Congress, became the first co-sponsor of HR 1187.

Past versions of the Act have been supported by both political parties and it is a revenue-neutral bill, meaning no new spending or taxes are involved. However, through this legislation, Congress can direct the National Institutes of Health to allocate existing discretionary resources specifically to IBS and other functional gastrointestinal and motility disorders, such as GERD, gastroparesis, chronic idiopathic psuedo-obstruction, functional dyspepsia, short bowel syndrome, Hirschsprung’s disease, cyclic vomiting syndrome, chronic bowel incontinence from various causes, and many others, which collectively affect about 25% of Americans. Irritable bowel syndrome is the most common of these. NIH grants funding to researchers throughout the world, not just in the U.S., so in the long run, enactment of this Act may also benefit readers with IBS in other countries. Medical research often involves multinational teams of scientists, and in any case, study results are usually published globally, adding to cumulative scientific knowledge among professionals and public awareness of various conditions worldwide.

In order to pass the House of Representatives in this Congress, HR 1187 needs support from 218 Representatives, a majority of the House, by the end of the current 115th Congress in December 2018. During 2011-2012, the previous bill received sponsorship or co-sponsorship from 17 Representatives in 12 states and both political parties, in 2013-2014, 20 Representatives from 13 states and both political parties, and in 2015-2016, 13 Representatives from 7 states and both political parties. Some are no longer members of the House of Representatives, but IBS Impact hopes that previous cosponsors who are still in office will continue their support and encourage their colleagues to sign on as well. Now affected people and our supporters must show Congress that this is important enough to pass and enact.

For more information, see IFFGD’s link at: https://iffgd.org/advocacy-activities/congressional-bill.html
The text of the bill, the current status and cosponsors can also be accessed directly at any time through its official Congressional database entry at Congress.gov. If you do not know who your Representative is, you can look up this information by entering your zipcode in the “Find Your Representative” search box with the white U.S. map graphic near the top right corner of your screen at house.gov. In some zipcodes, different areas fall into two or more different Congressional districts, in which case you will then be prompted to enter your exact street address to determine the correct district.

Clicking on your Representative’s name will take you to his or her official House website, which will have contact forms, links or details. If you already know who your Representative is, you can generally find the website by typing his or her name into any Internet search engine. Because modern security procedures for postal mail may result in significant delays, legislators generally prefer to hear from constituents through email/website contact forms or telephone. If you choose to call, it is preferable to ask for the staff person in charge of health issues, but if he or she is not available, you may leave a message or speak to the person who answers your call. Many legislators also have social media accounts.

Your specific personal experiences as a person with IBS and/or other functional gastrointestinal disorder or a family member, friend or professional who supports us, and how HR 1187 is needed are most effective in communicating that we are real people behind the statistics. However, even a polite general request can demonstrate to your Member of Congress that there are many constituents interested in the swift passage of this Act.

When writing and/or calling, be sure to state your name, where you live in the Congressional district and that you are a constituent. Tell briefly why you are interested in HR 1187 so they know who you are and why the bill is important– such as have had IBS for X years, have had difficulty finding adequate relief or have a family member with IBS, etc. If you are prepared with a few reputable facts and details about IBS in general to show that this is a widespread issue, not just your personal problem, these also help in showing credibility on the issue. The IFFGD link above has some suggested talking points.  Familiarity with your Representative’s record on or interest in other health issues may also help,  but if you do not know these things, telling your own experience is fine. Be sure to say thank you. Then pass the word to family, friends, coworkers or classmates who have been supportive of you with your IBS. Keep in mind that because of the 2016 elections and redistricting, you may have a different Representative than before, even if you have not changed your residence.

Please sign your real full name, physical address and email address if you choose to write,  or give this information to the staff member you speak to you choose to call on the telephone. Most offices will request it near the end of the call so that they have a record of callers and issues discussed. This is important so that Congressional staff members know that you are actually a constituent and potential voter in their district. Many legislators do not accept communications from those outside their own districts. They may also wish to respond to you, although it may take several attempts to attract attention or some time to receive a reply. Please contact only your member of the U.S. House of Representatives at this time. The President, Senators, Governors or other state or local officials do not have any control over this part of the legislative process.

You do not have to be an excellent writer or speaker, just one that your Representative and his or her staff will see as a real person with real issues and real needs, not a “canned” request copied and pasted from somebody else’s letter. Keep your message short– one page or less in writing, or a phone message or conversation of a couple minutes.

This is a major opportunity for the IBS community and its various websites, groups and organizations to come together, regardless of political or philosophical differences, make our needs known, and do something to make our lives better in the future. Self-advocacy to get legislation enacted takes time, effort and patience, but it is possible if more people are willing to make noise publicly, as other health and disability groups do.

For all those with IBS who complain that nobody understands and nobody wants to do anything for us, now is your chance to make yourself heard. Some people want to understand and help. Congress has the power to make this bill happen. Each of us has the power to make it happen by coming out of the closet, getting over the embarrassment and asking publicly and persistently for this very specific help. It only takes a few minutes to write an email or pick up the phone. Please do it.


GERD Awareness Week: November 20-26, 2016

November 21, 2016

This week is the annual GERD Awareness Week. Gastroesophageal reflux disease, like IBS, falls under the broad category of functional gastrointestinal and motility disorders, and many people with IBS also have GERD. According to About.com IBS Guide Barbara Bradley Bolen, PhD, some studies show that over 70% of people with IBS report some symptoms of GERD and vice versa, but that among those with actual diagnoses, the overlap rate ranges from about one-quarter to one-third. GERD occurs when the lower esophageal sphincter, the valve connecting the esophagus to the stomach, fails to close completely and consistently when needed, and stomach acids and digested food inappropriately back up into the esophagus on a recurring basis. GERD is estimated to affect at least 20% of American adults, both men and women. GERD also commonly affects children of all ages, including infants. A wide variety of lifestyle factors, medical conditions and medication side effects are thought to be possible factors in causing or exacerbating GERD.

Symptoms vary from person to person and are not restricted to heartburn. Some people may not have noticeable symptoms at all until they experience complications. Some other possible symptoms of GERD are: belching, coughing, hoarseness, difficulty or pain in swallowing, excessive saliva, the sensation of food sticking in the esophagus,  chronically sore or irritated throat, laryngitis, inflammation of the gums, erosion of tooth enamel, bitter taste in the mouth, and bad breath. Chest pain may also be a symptom of GERD, but should receive immediate medical attention to rule out the possibility of cardiac problems or other serious conditions. Other possible symptoms of GERD occurring more than once a week or the need to use non-prescription heartburn/reflux medications for more than two weeks without resolution should be discussed with a doctor.

Relative to other functional gastrointestinal and motility disorders, GERD is generally considered by physicians and many affected people to be quite treatable by a variety of lifestyle and diet modifications, prescription medications and/or surgery. Many people have mild GERD and, with appropriate medical care, are at low risk of serious complications, but untreated GERD can lead to inflammation, erosion or narrowing of the esophagus or, in a small percentage of cases, Barrett’s esophagus, cell changes that heighten the risk of esophageal cancer. According to a brief extract of a longer IFFGD publication by Carlo DiLorenzo, M.D. of Children’s Hospital of Columbus and Ohio State University, Dr. Mark Glassman, MD of Sound Shore Medical Center in New Rochelle, New York, and Paul Hyman, M.D. of Children’s Hospital in New Orleans, Louisiana, some children with GERD and other conditions such as asthma, cystic fibrosis, abnormal lung development due to premature birth, muscle or nerve disorders affecting swallowing, or esophageal dysplasia, are at risk of GERD complicating those conditions.

Please see the following links for further information and resources and the original source for Drs. DiLorenzo, Glassman and Hyman’s work mentioned above.  IFFGD also offers downloadable GERD, IBS and functional GI and motility disorder awareness brochures and posters for anyone to hang or distribute in his or her own community, that are accessible from the IFFGD links posted here. As American Thanksgiving is approaching this week, readers may find IFFGD’s holiday GERD-reducing tips to be particularly useful.

 GERD Awareness Week section from the IFFGD About GERD website

Pediatric GERD section from the IFFGD About Kids  GI website

Medline Plus page on GERD  (subunit of the U.S. National Institutes of Health)

In addition to encouraging accurate awareness of irritable bowel syndrome, IBS Impact encourages awareness of related conditions that are known to often overlap with IBS, as improvement in symptom management, treatment options, public awareness and social resources may have overlapping positive effects that improve quality of life for some people with IBS. With the high prevalence of GERD in the general public, many people who are not otherwise aware of or who do not take particular interest in functional gastrointestinal and motility disorders may actually have GERD or be close to someone who does. This is another opportunity to educate them about GERD and about FGIMDs in general as issues that do indeed involve them.


Veterans with IBS and Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders 2016

November 11, 2016

Today, November 11, is Veterans Day in the U.S., and a good time to highlight veterans’ issues. U.S. veterans  and current military service members who have been deployed in the Persian Gulf/Southwest Asia region at any time since 1990 have been shown by multiple studies to be at even higher risk of IBS and other functional GI disorders than the general population. Conservative estimates put the incidence of functional GI disorders in the general population as 25%, most commonly irritable bowel syndrome. For veterans and military service members of the Persian Gulf era, the estimate may reach as high as 40%. This appears to be in part because of the high incidence of known functional GI risk factors during active duty, such as severe stress or trauma and/or food or water contamination that results in post-infectious IBS  (IBS-PI) or other post-infectious functional GI and motility disorders.

Here is IBS Impact’s August 12, 2011 post on the recognition four years ago by the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs of irritable bowel syndrome and functional gastrointestinal disorders as presumptive service connected disabilities for Gulf War veterans.

IFFGD has done considerable work in the past several years in advocating for federal funding and other legislative needs specific to veterans, conducting outreach to service members and veterans and encouraging those affected by functional GI and motility disorders to participate in veteran-specific self-advocacy efforts. Since fiscal year 2012, functional GI disorders have been included in the Department of Defense Gulf War Illness Research Program, which is part of the Congressionally Directed Medical Research Program. However, advocacy from the veteran community and supporters must occur on an ongoing basis for funding to be continued each fiscal year. Interest in veteran issues has been one reason for Congressional support of the Functional Gastrointestinal and Motility Disorders Research Enhancement Act of 2015, HR 2311, currently in the House of Representatives, aimed toward improving the lives of affected veterans and civilians alike, and must continue to build.

As this blog reported on January 20, 2014, the depth of need for further awareness, services, support, and research in the veteran community is not necessarily well known even within the Department of Defense or other military entities, the media or the general public. The post linked in the second paragraph of this post about the recognition of IBS and other functional GI disorders as presumptive service-connected disabilities, more than five years after original publication, has continued to receive consistent hits from readers nearly every day. By an extremely wide margin, from the inception of this blog in mid-2011 through 2015, it was the #1 most read individual post, of over 200 cumulative posts on this blog. It was also the #1 most read post for each individual year.  Not until the release of the Rome IV international diagnostic criteria in late May of this year, did it drop to #2 on the all-time and 2016-to-date lists.Clearly, a very strong need exists for information and resources on this topic. It is hoped that given the relatively higher impact of functional GI disorders among veterans and service members, and their relatively higher profile as a constituent group, any advances on behalf of the affected veterans and service members will eventually carry over to people with functional GI disorders in general.

IBS Impact encourages veterans, service members and families in the IBS and functional GI community, as well as those who support them,  to familiarize themselves with the issues and resources, and to consider participating in self-advocacy activities. We look forward to feedback from readers as to how IBS Impact may be able to support such efforts further.


Interview and Video with Emeran Mayer, MD of UCLA on the Gut-Brain-Microbiome Connection in IBS

September 30, 2016

Earlier this month, WBUR, the Boston affiliate of National Public Radio published a recent interview with Emeran Mayer, MD, Director of the University of California/Los Angeles Oppenheimer Center for Neurobiology of Stress and Resilience, a leading research center for irritable bowel syndrome and other neurologically-based chronic pain conditions. Dr. Mayer also recently published a book on the mind-gut connection and is a longtime board member of the International Foundation for Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders (IFFGD).

The gut-brain or brain-gut connection has been scientifically established for over two decades to be a major factor in IBS and other functional gastrointestinal disorders, and has recently evolved to the brain-gut-microbiome connection as a result of further research since then.

Excerpts of WBUR’s interview with Dr. Mayer are available at the link below. Also included on WBUR’s web page for this article is an embedded link for a TEDxUCLA talk Dr. Mayer gave on the subject in 2015. The TEDxUCLA video has a run time of a bit over 21 minutes.

http://www.wbur.org/commonhealth/2016/09/16/the-mind-gut-connection

Although these concepts are complex and may take some time for people with IBS and family members who do not have science backgrounds to understand, the time and effort is well worth it to know more about what IBS is, might be, and is not.


Representatives Engel of New York and Pocan and Kind of Wisconsin Co-Sponsor HR 2311 for Functional Gastrointestinal and Motility Disorders

July 11, 2016

According to IFFGD/the Digestive Health Alliance and the official Congressional legislative database Congress.gov, Representative Eliot Engel (D-NY-16), Representative Mark Pocan (D-WI-2), and Ron Kind (D-WI-3) have recently signed on as a co-sponsors to the Functional Gastrointestinal and Motility Disorders Research Enhancement Act of 2015.

Representative Engel is serving his fifteenth term in the House of Representatives. His current district, the 16th Congressional District of New York  encompasses the northern portion of the Bronx, which is one of the boroughs of New York City, as well as parts of suburban southern Westchester County. Representative Engel is the first co-sponsor who is also a current member of the Subcommittee on Health, where HR 2311 is  under consideration.  See the linked website for a list of all current members. Representative Engel has a long record of supporting  a wide range of veterans’ issues and health issues, as seen on his official house website. As previously discussed on this blog on August 12, 2011 and August 25, 2011, military service members and veterans are at disproportionately high risk for functional gastrointestinal disorders like IBS, which are already very common in the general population.

Representative Pocan is serving his second term in the House of Representatives. His district, the 2nd Congressional District of Wisconsin, encompasses Dane County, Iowa County, Lafayette County, Sauk County and Green County and parts of Richland and Rock Counties, including the state capital of Madison and environs. According to his official House website, Representative Pocan is a member of the House Committee on the Budget, and he supports various health and veterans’ issues.

Representative Kind is serving his tenth term as a member of the House of Representatives. His district, the 3rd Congressional District of Wisconsin, represents the western part of the state, including La Crosse, Eau Claire and Platteville. Representative Kind’s official House website can be found at the link. Representative Kind has a record of supporting veterans’ issues. He is also a former member of the Subcommittee on Health and was also a co-sponsor of HR 2239 in the 112th Congress (2011-2012) and HR 842 in the 113th Congress (2013-2014), previous versions of HR 2311 which did not pass. IBS Impact thanks him for his continuing  support over three successive Congressional terms.

If you are a constituent of Representative Engel, Representative Pocan or Representative Kind,  please take a few minutes to write or call him with your thanks for his support of the functional gastrointestinal and motility disorders community.

In officially supporting HR 2311, Representative Engel, Representative Pocan and Representative Kind  join Representative F. James Sensenbrenner, Jr. (R-WI-5) , who is the initial sponsor,  Representative Andre Carson (D-IN-7), Representative Zoe Lofgren (D-CA-19) and Representative Gwen Moore (D-WI-4), Representative David Young (R-IA-3), Representative David Loebsack (D-IA-2), Representative Keith Rothfus (R-PA-12), and Representative David Joyce (R-OH-14), and Representative Sean Duffy, (R-WI-7) If you are a constituent of any of these Representatives, please thank them as well.

U. S. citizens, if your Member of Congress is not yet a co-sponsor of HR 2311, please see the previous post from May 18, 2015 for links to the bill and more details on how to do so.  Often, it takes multiple attempts to elicit any interest from legislators, so if you do not receive a reply, do not hesitate to try again or to switch contact methods until you attract attention. Keep in mind that your Representative may be different from before because of the 2014 elections, district boundaries that may have been re-drawn, or if you have moved.

Your personal experiences as a person with IBS and/or other functional GI/motility disorders, or as a concerned family member, friend or colleague, are most effective in communicating to legislators and their staff that there are real human beings behind the statistics. However, even general expressions of support are helpful.

HR 2311 is bipartisan legislation (supported by members of both parties) and according to IFFGD discussions with IBS Impact,  is “revenue-neutral,” meaning that there will be no additional taxes or spending added to the current federal deficit if it is enacted. Discretionary funds are available at the National Institutes of Health to be allocated if Congress directs NIH, through this Act, that functional gastrointestinal and motility disorders are a priority. Congress will only do so if we, as a community, are able to show them the importance of the research, education and FDA coordination provided for in HR 2311.

NIH grants funding to researchers throughout the world, not just in the U.S., so in the long run, enactment of this Act may also benefit readers with IBS in other countries. Medical research also sometimes involves multinational teams of scientists, and in any case, study results are usually published globally, adding to the cumulative knowledge worldwide.

It is IBS Impact’s understanding that HR 2311 will not require a debate or vote on the floor of the House of Representatives, and will pass as soon as it reaches 218 sponsor/cosponsors, or a simple majority of the House. In order for this milestone to be accomplished during the current Congress, the 114th,  the necessary number of sponsor/cosponsors must be reached by December 2016. Every two years, the Congressional membership will be different as a result of elections. Thus, if HR 2311 has not passed by that time,  a similar bill will have to be reintroduced and the FGIMD community will have to start the process of gathering co-sponsors anew. This is what occurred with HR 2239 in 2012 and HR 842 in 2014. While it is quite common for legislation of various sorts to take several Congresses to pass, our continuing advocacy now can increase awareness, build momentum and perhaps accelerate passage. It is in our hands.

Check back on this blog or join IBS Impact’s Facebook page or Twitter feed for further updates on HR 2311 as they occur. Links to the social media sites can be found on the right sidebar of the blog.


Representative Duffy of Wisconsin Co-Sponsors HR 2311 for Functional Gastrointestinal and Motility Disorders

July 5, 2016

According to IFFGD/the Digestive Health Alliance and the official Congressional legislative database Congress.gov, Representative Sean Duffy (R-WI-7) has recently signed on as a co-sponsor to the Functional Gastrointestinal and Motility Disorders Research Enhancement Act of 2015.

Representative Duffy is serving his third term in the House of Representatives. His district, the 7th Congressional District of Wisconsin, encompasses the northwestern and central regions of the state, including Ashland, Barron, Bayfield, Burnett, Chippewa, Douglas, Iron, Lincoln, Marathon, Oneida, Polk, Portage, Price, Rusk, Sawyer, Taylor, Washburn and Wood Counties and parts of Clark and Langlade Counties.  According to his official House website, Representative Duffy has a record of supporting veterans’ issues. As previously discussed on this blog on August 12, 2011 and August 25, 2011, military service members and veterans are at disproportionately high risk for functional gastrointestinal disorders like IBS, which are already very common in the general population.

If you are a constituent of Representative Duffy,  please take a few minutes to write or call him with your thanks for his support of the functional gastrointestinal and motility disorders community.

In officially supporting HR 2311, Representative Duffy  joins Representative F. James Sensenbrenner, Jr. (R-WI-5) , who is the initial sponsor,  Representative Andre Carson (D-IN-7), Representative Zoe Lofgren (D-CA-19) and Representative Gwen Moore (D-WI-4), Representative David Young (R-IA-3), Representative David Loebsack (D-IA-2), Representative Keith Rothfus (R-PA-12), and Representative David Joyce (R-OH-14). If you are a constituent of any of these Representatives, please thank them as well.

According to the information on Congress.gov, it appears that the bill is currently under consideration in the Subcommittee on Health. Click on the link above if you would like to see a list of its members.

U. S. citizens, if your Member of Congress is not yet a co-sponsor of HR 2311, please see the previous post from May 18, 2015 for links to the bill and more details on how to do so.  Often, it takes multiple attempts to elicit any interest from legislators, so if you do not receive a reply, do not hesitate to try again or to switch contact methods until you attract attention. Keep in mind that your Representative may be different from before because of the 2014 elections, district boundaries that may have been re-drawn, or if you have moved.

Your personal experiences as a person with IBS and/or other functional GI/motility disorders, or as a concerned family member, friend or colleague, are most effective in communicating to legislators and their staff that there are real human beings behind the statistics. However, even general expressions of support are helpful.

HR 2311 is bipartisan legislation (supported by members of both parties) and according to IFFGD discussions with IBS Impact,  is “revenue-neutral,” meaning that there will be no additional taxes or spending added to the current federal deficit if it is enacted. Discretionary funds are available at the National Institutes of Health to be allocated if Congress directs NIH, through this Act, that functional gastrointestinal and motility disorders are a priority. Congress will only do so if we, as a community, are able to show them the importance of the research, education and FDA coordination provided for in HR 2311.

NIH grants funding to researchers throughout the world, not just in the U.S., so in the long run, enactment of this Act may also benefit readers with IBS in other countries. Medical research also sometimes involves multinational teams of scientists, and in any case, study results are usually published globally, adding to the cumulative knowledge worldwide.

It is IBS Impact’s understanding that HR 2311 will not require a debate or vote on the floor of the House of Representatives, and will pass as soon as it reaches 218 sponsor/cosponsors, or a simple majority of the House. In order for this milestone to be accomplished during the current Congress, the 114th,  the necessary number of sponsor/cosponsors must be reached by December 2016. Every two years, the Congressional membership will be different as a result of elections. Thus, if HR 2311 has not passed by that time,  a similar bill will have to be reintroduced and the FGIMD community will have to start the process of gathering co-sponsors anew. This is what occurred with HR 2239 in 2012 and HR 842 in 2014. While it is quite common for legislation of various sorts to take several Congresses to pass, our continuing advocacy now can increase awareness, build momentum and perhaps accelerate passage. It is in our hands.

Check back on this blog or join IBS Impact’s Facebook page or Twitter feed for further updates on HR 2311 as they occur. Links to the social media sites can be found on the right sidebar of the blog.


Representative Joyce of Ohio Co-Sponsors HR 2311 for Functional Gastrointestinal and Motility Disorders

June 28, 2016

According to IFFGD/the Digestive Health Alliance and the official Congressional legislative database Congress.gov, Representative Dave Joyce (R-OH-14) has recently signed on as a co-sponsor to the Functional Gastrointestinal and Motility Disorders Research Enhancement Act of 2015.

Representative Joyce is serving his second term in the House of Representatives. His district, the 14th Congressional District of Ohio,encompasses the northeastern region of the state bordering Lake Erie and the Pennsylvania, including  Ashtabula, Lake, and Geauga Counties, eastern Cuyahoga County, northern Trumbull County, northern Portage County, and northeastern Summit County. According to his official House website, Representative Joyce is currently a member of the House Subcommittee on Military Construction and Veterans’ Affairs.  As previously discussed on this blog on August 12, 2011 and August 25, 2011, military service members and veterans are at disproportionately high risk for functional gastrointestinal disorders like IBS, which are already very common in the general population. Representative Joyce also is a member of several caucuses supporting other specific health conditions.

If you are a constituent of Representative Joyce,  please take a few minutes to write or call him with your thanks for his support of the functional gastrointestinal and motility disorders community.

In officially supporting HR 2311, Representative Joyce  joins Representative F. James Sensenbrenner, Jr. (R-WI-5) , who is the initial sponsor,  Representative Andre Carson (D-IN-7), Representative Zoe Lofgren (D-CA-19) and Representative Gwen Moore (D-WI-4), Representative David Young (R-IA-3), Representative David Loebsack (D-IA-2), and Representative Keith Rothfus (R-PA-12) If you are a constituent of any of these Representatives, please thank them as well.

According to the information on Congress.gov, it appears that the bill is currently under consideration in the Subcommittee on Health. Click on the link above if you would like to see a list of its members.

U. S. citizens, if your Member of Congress is not yet a co-sponsor of HR 2311, please see the previous post from May 18, 2015 for links to the bill and more details on how to do so.  Often, it takes multiple attempts to elicit any interest from legislators, so if you do not receive a reply, do not hesitate to try again or to switch contact methods until you attract attention. Keep in mind that your Representative may be different from before because of the 2014 elections, district boundaries that may have been re-drawn, or if you have moved.

Your personal experiences as a person with IBS and/or other functional GI/motility disorders, or as a concerned family member, friend or colleague, are most effective in communicating to legislators and their staff that there are real human beings behind the statistics. However, even general expressions of support are helpful.

HR 2311 is bipartisan legislation (supported by members of both parties) and according to IFFGD discussions with IBS Impact,  is “revenue-neutral,” meaning that there will be no additional taxes or spending added to the current federal deficit if it is enacted. Discretionary funds are available at the National Institutes of Health to be allocated if Congress directs NIH, through this Act, that functional gastrointestinal and motility disorders are a priority. Congress will only do so if we, as a community, are able to show them the importance of the research, education and FDA coordination provided for in HR 2311.

NIH grants funding to researchers throughout the world, not just in the U.S., so in the long run, enactment of this Act may also benefit readers with IBS in other countries. Medical research also sometimes involves multinational teams of scientists, and in any case, study results are usually published globally, adding to the cumulative knowledge worldwide.

It is IBS Impact’s understanding that HR 2311 will not require a debate or vote on the floor of the House of Representatives, and will pass as soon as it reaches 218 sponsor/cosponsors, or a simple majority of the House. In order for this milestone to be accomplished during the current Congress, the 114th,  the necessary number of sponsor/cosponsors must be reached by December 2016. Every two years, the Congressional membership will be different as a result of elections. Thus, if HR 2311 has not passed by that time,  a similar bill will have to be reintroduced and the FGIMD community will have to start the process of gathering co-sponsors anew. This is what occurred with HR 2239 in 2012 and HR 842 in 2014. While it is quite common for legislation of various sorts to take several Congresses to pass, our continuing advocacy now can increase awareness, build momentum and perhaps accelerate passage. It is in our hands.

Check back on this blog or join IBS Impact’s Facebook page or Twitter feed for further updates on HR 2311 as they occur. Links to the social media sites can be found on the right sidebar of the blog.