Online Clinical Trial: Impact of IBS on Social Life or Interpersonal Relationships

The Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine is seeking adults age 18 years and older with a diagnosis of Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) to participate in a study evaluating patients’ social and interpersonal experiences.

Are you 18 years of age or older with a diagnosis of an IBS? The Center for Psychosocial Research in GI at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine is conducting a research study to better understand the impact IBS may have on your social life or interpersonal relationships, including the role that the attitudes of others may have. This study involves completing several questionnaires about your illness and well-being and should take you about 45 minutes to complete. If you would like to participate, you may do so online by clicking this link:

https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/NUISIBS

Your information will be kept completely anonymous and participation is voluntary. If you have questions about this study, you may contact Dr. Tiffany Taft at ttaft@northwestern.edu.

IBS Impact’s blog posts for July 26,   August 17 , October 3 and October 28 also have information on current clinical trials and related resources.

A page specifically to list studies was recently added to the IBS Impact main site, and we welcome researchers in any country to contact us with information they would like to have publicized. Please use the contact links on the home page of the main site. Our research and links pages also contain general resources that may be of interest to those with IBS who would like to participate in research studies.

For readers who are interested in the topic of relationships with family and friends who do not have IBS, we have a dedicated section of the main website specifically to share with family and friends. The articles contained there were written especially for IBS Impact by each author. We are happy to consider new submissions for this section in order to reflect a broad range of experiences from IBSers and those close to them.

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